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Or,gogo, you could say "screw the classes, screw the $3200, I'm just gunna buy and sell gems online" You could do that, but I highly advise against it. I'll throw a picture on here of a skull. It pass

There are no special t-shirts for explosive welding, so for a 25 year at job celebration of a collegue we are puzzling which funny t-shirt would be best as a gift:   This on back   And this on f

I sell raw gemstones such as these, and study to be a gemologist appraiser

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Weeeeeelllll! I'm just brave enough to watch the video... but no where near brave enough to climb like that!

 

Wow! Just wow.

 

I suppose one could acclimitize oneself to doing this, but it would take me a loong time to get to that point (read months of daily incremental attempts). If I did climb, it would be the slow, always safety lined way. My imagination is far too active.

 

Wow.

 

Oh... and as an added thought: I work as computer support. :)

Edited by FrostElfGuard
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@masteff

How do you do seismic surveys? Using something like a 'gun' shooting a heavy projectile at a short distance to ground, or drilling holes and put explosives in? We use Seismoblast explosives sometimes at work, same which are used for deep drill explosions. But we weld metals together and we need certain blast speeds related to the speed of sound of the metals we want to weld by explosive welding.

It's a non-explosive method... that truck has a steel mass in the middle and large round plate under it that is pressed against the ground, then the mass is vibrated up and down using hydraulics, it really is similar to a sub-woofer. IIRC it produces a sweep from 10 to 300 Hz http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seismic_source#Seismic_vibrator and we actually just build the vibrators and sell them to people who do the surveys.

 

Oh, one funny story... we're a few hundred feet away from a commercial bread plant and they asked us to stop testing our vibrators at full strength because it shakes the ground so hard that we were shaking dust from the rafters into their bread.

Edited by masteff
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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm a little late to this party, but no effing way you would get me climbing that thing! I used to work on cranes, I don't mind being up high is something secured, but just that climbing part at the top, GAH! lol

 

Props to you, guys that do that sort of work do not get paid enough. I had no idea you were that bada$$!

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Heights have just never bothered me. Guess it's the part Indian in me. As a kid I used to do somersaults off my roof into a pile of leaves :sigh: The pay is pretty good (I had a separate rate when I climbed). But now we use an outside contractor when we need any tower work done above 100 feet. The liability insurance is basically the reason why. It's way too expensive unless you're climbing full-time.

 

The best jobs were for the local airports. You'd have a tower beacon go out and that tower was right along a flight path for either departures or arrivals. So here I am at double pay climbing a tower in the middle of the night to replace a big light bulb basically. I would bring a 6-pack with me. Change the light and just kick back and toss down a few while taking in the sights. The job from start to finish would take 3-6 hrs (not including travel time). I really really miss doing that. Plus, one emergency night call was almost worth a week's regulalr pay didn't hurt either :viking:

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  • 3 months later...

My job history goes from cleaning in hospitals to cooking burgers in McDonalds etc...

 

Atm doing Administrative things (e.g. checking darkmatters out, reading fan fiction, playing with paper & staplers) for the Taxes of Belgium.

 

SO pay your taxes or else! :mafia:

 

 

cheers!

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  • 3 weeks later...

I'm a pastry chef and sous chef at a "Fine dining/bistro style" french Restaurant. Love the job, and is still passionate about cooking and food. My main job is to prepare and plate all the desserts, Ice creams, sorbets, and friandise/mignardise, roll out/bake pastry for main courses, bake pies and I must take charge of the kitchen and plate starters and main courses when the chef is away.

Other than that I have to order all the stock from the store room everyday, help with stock taking, make sure the rest of the kitchen staff are aware of any functions that require different menus/ dietary requirements, and bending over backwards to make life more comfortable for the chef. :bow:

The first time I worked with chocolate, moulding chocolate, and coating chocolate.

post-15332-0-95096400-1297507131_thumb.jpg

Fellow students Ainsley Harriot and Me!

post-15332-0-51156800-1297507220_thumb.jpg

Before I got that job, I worked for my middle sister,

post-15332-0-38741300-1297507434_thumb.jpg

(left to right, oldest sister, middle sister, and cousin)

who owns a computer shop. That involves selling "USB's" to people who have no idea what a USB is! Drove me crazy out of my mind :Just_Cuz_21:

 

I also understand about being happy over $$$$! I get the same basic salary now, but working for my sister, I got commision, I stayed with my parents, got food and fuel money. Now I have to pay for accomodation, buy my own food, and transport is my own problem. But I'm sooooo much happier! :3lmao:

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I'm a pastry chef and sous chef at a "Fine dining/bistro style" french Restaurant. Love the job, and is still passionate about cooking and food. My main job is to prepare and plate all the desserts, Ice creams, sorbets, and friandise/mignardise, roll out/bake pastry for main courses, bake pies and I must take charge of the kitchen and plate starters and main courses when the chef is away.

Other than that I have to order all the stock from the store room everyday, help with stock taking, make sure the rest of the kitchen staff are aware of any functions that require different menus/ dietary requirements, and bending over backwards to make life more comfortable for the chef. :bow:

The first time I worked with chocolate, moulding chocolate, and coating chocolate.

Chocolate Chef Course - 9 May 09 036.jpg

Fellow students Ainsley Harriot and Me!

Image0723.jpg

Before I got that job, I worked for my middle sister,

F1040036.JPG

(left to right, oldest sister, middle sister, and cousin)

who owns a computer shop. That involves selling "USB's" to people who have no idea what a USB is! Drove me crazy out of my mind :Just_Cuz_21:

 

I also understand about being happy over $$$$! I get the same basic salary now, but working for my sister, I got commision, I stayed with my parents, got food and fuel money. Now I have to pay for accomodation, buy my own food, and transport is my own problem. But I'm sooooo much happier! :3lmao:

 

 

Delta, I am jealous! You have no idea how much of my time I spend watching Top Chef. In fact, I'm addicted more to the re-runs almost more than SacredWiki :4rofl:

 

Readig your post with all the words I heard coming out of my favorite tv show, good for you, and on top of that, you sound marvelously happy/

 

:)

 

gogo

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What I did for a living before was customer service at a Direct Energy, where I pretty much have to listen to people gripe about their gas contracts. :P All things considering, I may not like doing work over the phone, but it is one of the better places to work in compared to other companies where it's non-stop calls.

 

What I do now is work for a friend of mine at a plastics shop. We pretty much custom build whatever people want out of acrylics or foam PVC or anything else related, from simple little stands to boxes to cages to furniture to aquariums to... well, whatever people think of, so long as it's within or capabilities of course. It's how I managed to cut my thumb on a circular saw. :P

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I'm a pastry chef and sous chef at a "Fine dining/bistro style" french Restaurant. Love the job, and is still passionate about cooking and food. My main job is to prepare and plate all the desserts, Ice creams, sorbets, and friandise/mignardise, roll out/bake pastry for main courses, bake pies and I must take charge of the kitchen and plate starters and main courses when the chef is away.

Other than that I have to order all the stock from the store room everyday, help with stock taking, make sure the rest of the kitchen staff are aware of any functions that require different menus/ dietary requirements, and bending over backwards to make life more comfortable for the chef. :bow:

The first time I worked with chocolate, moulding chocolate, and coating chocolate.

post-15332-0-95096400-1297507131_thumb.jpg

Fellow students Ainsley Harriot and Me!

post-15332-0-51156800-1297507220_thumb.jpg

Before I got that job, I worked for my middle sister,

post-15332-0-38741300-1297507434_thumb.jpg

(left to right, oldest sister, middle sister, and cousin)

who owns a computer shop. That involves selling "USB's" to people who have no idea what a USB is! Drove me crazy out of my mind :Just_Cuz_21:

 

I also understand about being happy over $$$$! I get the same basic salary now, but working for my sister, I got commision, I stayed with my parents, got food and fuel money. Now I have to pay for accomodation, buy my own food, and transport is my own problem. But I'm sooooo much happier! :3lmao:

 

 

Delta, I am jealous! You have no idea how much of my time I spend watching Top Chef. In fact, I'm addicted more to the re-runs almost more than SacredWiki :4rofl:

 

Readig your post with all the words I heard coming out of my favorite tv show, good for you, and on top of that, you sound marvelously happy/

 

:)

 

gogo

 

 

Hey gogo.

 

I put some pictures up in a topic

http://darkmatters.org/forums/index.php?showtopic=17833

some of the stuff we serve at the restuarant. I don't have photos of everything, sometimes you are just to busy to take photos, and more orders are coming in, and the waiters are irritable, and and and...

 

Delta!

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  • 2 months later...

On Fridays I work at nuclear simulator. It's an exact replica of the actual control room. Recently we had Nova/PBS come in and take a tour. They made up an interactive panoramic view of the control room. There's quite a bit more than what is shown and I'm responsible for maintaining all of it. Any and all changes made at the actual plant have to be duplicated here. Hope you all check it out. Make sure to click on 'Launch Interactive'.

 

http://www.pbs.org/w...ntrol-room.html

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Knuckles

That is a SICK room to work in! lol don't let me in , I'll go nuts just flickin switches! I notice there's no donuts bar there... don't want anyone on a sugar buzz too close to the dials?>

 

The interactive ability to actually kind of go into the room is sharp. I can actually read what's on the monitors!

 

:)

 

gogo

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Any of you have a job which makes you cursing GoGo some days?

 

Is Rommel Gogo's name? A Rommel is german for a big rotating steel drum/barrel which is filled with metal parts and small pyramids or tetraeders. While rotating it smoothens surfaces. In english it it called barrel finishing or tumbling I was told: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tumble_finishing

 

The process is noisy and takes a while, so I find myself often saying "Auf Auf", which has more or less the meaning of "Go! Go!".

 

Perhaps I should nickname the machine GoGo now :)

 


 

Technical mathematician and cleaning the 'toilets'

 

Bats

Another strange part of our work is: we do productions runs only at summer nights. The explosive welding is done when buildings are empty except 2 people and all the bats left the bunkers for insect hunting. It is done in old world war2 rocket bunkers. In winter the bunkers are full of hibernating bats, counting several thousands of at least 5 diffrent species (DNA research showed that several identical looking bats may be different species, so the number of bat species popped up the last 20 years).

Around this time of the year the bats leave the bunkers and search for warmer places. The deep in earth bunkers are not freezing in winter but not getting warmer than 7 celcius in summer. So in late spring they leave and look for tree holes, field barns, ... to have kids.

So the winter resting places (toilets) have to be cleaned and researched. Collecting bats which died in winter, having tests done for rabies and other diseases, if they got metal polution (explosions blow metal dust around), and give the nice girls from biological and veterian department at the university something to research- perhaps have a new bat named after me.

 

Seems I got the 'toilet' cleaning job because of my hunting license which allows working with diseased animals. Cheaper to put me in bio-hazard clothes than to call for experts from the outside. But doing it is fun if you are not doing it for the whole year, some difference to either being bored when controlling material tests (80% of my posts here are done while doing this), or overly thrilled when finetuning explosives for optimal welding results.

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Thats pretty cool, theres stuff everywhere, must get really confusing when you first want to start doing things in there.

 

I remember the first time I walked in and saw everything...I was fairly overwhelmed. But it's not as confusing as it looks. Each panel is dedicated to a different aspect of the plant operation. The middle panels are the important ones while as you go toward the ends they become less critical. So if somethings breaks I'm typically only dealing with 1 or 2 panels at most. The center console you see front and center on the pics I'll be updating soon. All new pc's, phones, switches etc.

 

There's another room behind where the camera was located taking these shots, that's where the donuts are gogo :D

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Any of you have a job which makes you cursing GoGo some days?

 

 

lol

don't get my parents going

 

:P

 

Is Rommel Gogo's name?

 

 

Yee haw! Indeed^^

 

There's another room behind where the camera was located taking these shots, that's where the donuts are gogo :D

 

I'm on me way!

 

:bounce:

 

gogo

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Perhaps I should nickname the machine GoGo now :)

 

And it is a 'blender' of sorts... ;)

 

Seems I got the 'toilet' cleaning job because of my hunting license which allows working with diseased animals. Cheaper to put me in bio-hazard clothes than to call for experts from the outside. But doing it is fun if you are not doing it for the whole year, some difference to either being bored when controlling material tests (80% of my posts here are done while doing this), or overly thrilled when finetuning explosives for optimal welding results.

Lol... just envisioned some hazmat-suit wearing guy with a laptop (posting @ Dark Matters, of course) in the middle of some old WW2 bunker... guano everywhere... ok... don't know whats' so funny about it, it just made me giggle -looks around awkardly-

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I can't show you any photo's as were are not allowed to take camera's onto site.

 

I work for Boeing Defence UK.

 

Very interesting................*cough* ! :whistle:

 

 

Secret agent man!

 

 

:bounce:

 

gogo

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On Fridays I work at nuclear simulator. It's an exact replica of the actual control room. Recently we had Nova/PBS come in and take a tour. They made up an interactive panoramic view of the control room. There's quite a bit more than what is shown and I'm responsible for maintaining all of it. Any and all changes made at the actual plant have to be duplicated here. Hope you all check it out. Make sure to click on 'Launch Interactive'.

 

http://www.pbs.org/w...ntrol-room.html

 

I must admit, there is definitely an urge to start mashing buttons at random... :)

:explode:

:sun:

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  • 2 weeks later...

zwergfledermaus.jpg

 

Currently we have 12 baby bats at work. All are common pipistrelles. The picture above is a nearly adult! It has brown and not black fur, so you can guess how tiny these bats are (Zwergfledermaus is german for dwarf bat).

 

Our normal procedure when detecting baby bats on ground is to use plastic gloves (so they don't get human smell) and let them lick high fat cat milk from the gloves. We use a beverage can , bottom up, and fill the nest like metal bowl with some wool rests we use for cleaning machines.

 

We place the baby bat in this nest and bring it close to its normal resting place. If it is still in the nest the next morning it has to be hand feeded. If not: the mother detected its ultra sonics cries, landed, the baby grapped the mothers furry belly and the mother lifted both to ceiling again. So by using the beverage cans we know which babies have to be cared for. New fallen down babies are not able to climb the can.

 

12 babies weren't picked up till 7am (when bats return from hunting and go to sleep).

 

As long they need milk we rotate in feeding them, sales people, workers, secretary, bat toilet guy ( :) )... Even we loose working time, doing it results in a happy small company. The good thing is they drink daytime when the mother is at 'home' and sleep nighttime when the mother is out for hunting. So all they need at night is a canary cage covered with a towel and a light bulb above for a bit warming and they can hang around. The sides of the cage had to be surrounded with a tiny net. They are so small, they can escape through the metal bars of a normal cage.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDvOYDJ77sM

 

WARNING

Be careful in bat feeding if living in USA or Canada. As far as I know cave climber tourists brought a nasty mold from europe to america. While european bats are nearly immune to it, american ones aren't. So as sad as it sounds, by picking up and feeding a baby bat you may help to spread the disease. It is called white nose syndrome and 90% of all bats in an affected area are dying. Best call an animal care institute and ask if you live in an affected area.

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  • 3 weeks later...

We had some bad storms roll thru yesterday so I spent all day running around fixing antennas. One in particular was fairly tough. I had a 180lb dual antenna array partially tear loose and bend over, right over an entrance. It was barely holding on. Had to secure it and then winch it back in. I'm up about 225 feet and the winds were gusting up to 50 mph....good times :P

 

Me securing antennas

 

DSCF1416.jpg

 

View from the bottom (look at left edge of highest roof - where antenna is)

 

DSCF1407.jpg

 

Scenic view (is a great view from there)

 

DSCF1423.jpg

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