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chattius

The related food game

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I got this idea while being a Strohwitwer (a man whose wife is away for a time) and reading the related words game. Our second is in hospital for at least 5 weeks and 500 kilometres away. My wife will stay there for the first 2 weeks so it is my job to keep the rest of the family alive meanwhile.

What I am doing: I press boiled potatoes which are left over through a a sort of sieve. I mix them with fine cut raw potatoes and a bit of citron juice, fill them in 750gramm vacuum boxes and cool (not freeze) them in our clay cellar (around 7 celcius even in summer). They are eatable for maximal 3 weeks this way. We call this potatoe mix 'Klossteig halb und halb' which translates as Dumpling dough half(boiled) and half(raw). The lemon juice is needed so the mix stays white and not becomes gray. You can buy the mix here in shops too. So whenever we have no time we use this mix:

 

 

Potatoe pancakes:

Open a Klossteig bag. Add an egg, 4 spoons creme fraiche, cut a carot in fine stripes, fine cut an onion, mix all and ready for the pan.

 

227199-bigfix-reibekuchen-aus-klossteig.jpg227202-bigfix-reibekuchen-aus-klossteig.jpg

 

 

 

Potatoe croquettes:

Open a Klossteig bag, add some fine cut herbs, form croquettes, boil till the croquettes start to swim, open an egg, roll the croquettes in egg, roll now in breadcrumb, deep fry, ready

103187-bigfix-kroketten-selbstgemacht.jpg315856-bigfix-kroketten-selbstgemacht.jpg

 

 

 

Potatoe dumplings (Wetzsteinklösse):

Wetzstein is a whetstone and so normally it is without lemon juice and gray.

Open a Klossteig bag, add some fine cut herbs, add egg, form big finger shaped dumplings, boil till dumpling start to swim, serve with roasted onions and bacon

 

 

 

Klossteig Pizza

Open a Klossteig bag, use it as dough for a pizza: add roasted Speck (fat bacon), champignons, herbs, onion, garlic, creme freche and cheese ---ready for the oven, ...

 

11819-bigfix-klossteig-pizza-mit-speckauflage.jpg11820-bigfix-klossteig-pizza-mit-speckauflage.jpg

 

11823-bigfix-klossteig-pizza-mit-speckauflage.jpg31895-bigfix-klossteig-pizza-mit-speckauflage.jpg

 

 

 

Small microwave potatoe dumplings:

Open a Klossteig bag, form small balls, cut a leek in small rings, add some seasonal fine cut herbs, a pepper mix, a cup creme fraiche, 100gramm bacon and 100 gramm cheese (we are used to Handkäse, but more common is same as you use for pizza). Microwave 15 minutes, 600 Watt.

 

16409-bigfix-kartoffelkloesschen-in-schinken-lauch-sosse.jpg

 

So I know what to do with leftover boiled potatoes.

 

So the start would be: We have a pound of spaghtetti left from the day before....

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Hi Chattius.

 

The Klossteig Pizza nad the croquettes looks delicious. makes me want to start making them right now!

 

What can you do with a pound of leftover spaghetti?

 

Roasted tomato pasta, with basil pesto and some grated hard cheese (parmesan or asiago is ideal, but pecorino will also work)

 

Put the tomatoes(large tomatoes cut into slices, or whole coctail/cherry tomatoes) in an oven tray, sprinkle brown sugar over, season with salt and pepper add a little balsamic vinegar, worchester sauce and enough olive oil to coat everything. add some fresh herb sprigs like rosemary and thyme, cover with foil (to prevent splattering the oven) and roast in the oven till the tomatoes are cooked and a surypy sauce has formed.

Mix the spaghetti with the basil pesto and put it on the plates, divide the tomatoes evenly, spoon some of the sauce over, and sprinkle some of the grated cheese over! :chef:

Edited by Delta!

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omg chattius you have just made me soooo hungry....my stomach is actually rumbling now lol

 

 

Just let me know what time dinner is and I'll be there :drool:

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Hi Chattius.

 

The Klossteig Pizza nad the croquettes looks delicious. makes me want to start making them right now!

 

What can you do with a pound of leftover spaghetti?

 

Roasted tomato pasta, with basil pesto and some grated hard cheese (parmesan or asiago is ideal, but pecorino will also work)

 

Put the tomatoes(large tomatoes cut into slices, or whole coctail/cherry tomatoes) in an oven tray, sprinkle brown sugar over, season with salt and pepper add a little balsamic vinegar, worchester sauce and enough olive oil to coat everything. add some fresh herb sprigs like rosemary and thyme, cover with foil (to prevent splattering the oven) and roast in the oven till the tomatoes are cooked and a surypy sauce has formed.

Mix the spaghetti with the basil pesto and put it on the plates, divide the tomatoes evenly, spoon some of the sauce over, and sprinkle some of the grated cheese over! :chef:

 

That... sounds awesome!

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Thanks, I know parmesan, but I never tried asiago or pecorino. What I used allready is Hobelkäse (plane cheese, cheese which is cut in small slices/tolls using a plane=Hobel) or Sbrinz.

Both are swiss hard cheese which has to ripe for several years too, same as parmesan. Each of the hard cheese variants tastes a bit different. But I consider expensive variants as a waste of money as long as the kids are gourmands and not gourmets.

 

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Mett: raw minced meat

 

Leftover from yesterday's Polterabend party. A firefighter-friend is going to marry today and so the day before a Polterabend is done at the house of the bride. After all guests arrived and had thrown their porcelan on the street they moved to the firefighting building because the house of the bride had no room for 200+ guests.

 

220px-Mettbroetchen.jpg Another common leftover in our region is Mett. At parties often a bowl with Mett, a smaller bowl with chopped onions and a basket with half bread rolls and dices of sour dough bread are on a table. So guests can smear their bread rolls/bread and add onions at their tasting.

 

When the party ends there are often some pounds of Mett left. Since it is raw you have to use it right away. I did a rough cleanup after the party with my oldest daughter and we saw the Mett,2 pounds left, and there was no refridgerator in the firefighter building . So I taught my daughter an old family recipe, normally done when we slaughtered a pig at the farm of my grandparents., but I had to improvise.

 

I did a 10 litre pot, added the met, the rest of onions, pieces from the bread rolls, a cup of vinegar and a cup of sour cream from the salade bar and cut the herbs which were mainly as an ornament to fine pieces and added them too. While sweeping out the room the soup boiled. Then I added pieces from the sour dough bread dices. Instead of eating I put a blanket on the pot and we left.

 

At our house slaughterings my grandma did something similiar and called it sour brew. It was a sour soup which was refreshing and had an interesting taste. I think there is some fermenting done while it rests because of the sour dough. So today's evening when we are at firefighters and help to carry all the tables and chairs away we may try the soup. Hope I did not too much wrong remembering the old recipe.

 

I wonder: is Mett used outside germany too? And what do you do with leftovers. In difference to normal unspiced minced meat Mett is spiced and roasting it will remove fat while spices stay: result it is too sharp and too much pepper. So a soap sounded like a good idea: the spices have one day to spread in whole soup.

Edited by chattius

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Hi Chattius.

 

The Klossteig Pizza nad the croquettes looks delicious. makes me want to start making them right now!

 

What can you do with a pound of leftover spaghetti?

 

Roasted tomato pasta, with basil pesto and some grated hard cheese (parmesan or asiago is ideal, but pecorino will also work)

 

Put the tomatoes(large tomatoes cut into slices, or whole coctail/cherry tomatoes) in an oven tray, sprinkle brown sugar over, season with salt and pepper add a little balsamic vinegar, worchester sauce and enough olive oil to coat everything. add some fresh herb sprigs like rosemary and thyme, cover with foil (to prevent splattering the oven) and roast in the oven till the tomatoes are cooked and a surypy sauce has formed.

Mix the spaghetti with the basil pesto and put it on the plates, divide the tomatoes evenly, spoon some of the sauce over, and sprinkle some of the grated cheese over! :chef:

 

Made the Roasted tomato pasta for staff meal tonight. took a picture

 

 

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Roasted noodles:

Roasted noodles and tomatoes are tasty. But I prefer fresh tomatoes from garden and it is the wrong season.

 

What we finally did with the spaghetti: roasting them with stripes of napa cabbage, carrots and some Mett and sun flower seeds (roasted they add a crispy and cross chewing).

 

Our second daughter is in a hospital 500 kilometres away for at least 5 weeks. We visited her at weekend. So we used up all the stuff still in refridgerator sunday at 9pm when we returned home. Actually sun flower seeds are unused bird food. We had 100 pounds of them for feeding wild birds but the first green appears allready so no much need to feed them this much anymore.

 

I think napa cabbage tastes best if cut in stripes and roasted.

 

Sour Soup:

The sour soup at fire fighters must have been tasty, because I got 3 emails asking for the recipe. Couldn't eat myself because we had to leave earlier because there was snow on the autobahn we had to travel to visit our daughter at hospital.

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This thread was a fantastic topic to read, and have my stomach growl to ^^

 

I have an idea though... Theuns, what if we had this topic move in the mechanics as we just have to list a food or any thing that's edible that can come from as a leftover from the earlier mentioned food.

 

It would require us some skill for this because it's all about food, would be awesome to play! It would be great to get this topic going in , but in a lighter way, and or course, we can always put in our recipes as we chart off delicious yummies along the game path.

 

If this is okay, since you started this topic, how bout throwing down the next food challenge word, and any of us can run with it...course there many not be many bites of it left when we get to the next person

 

:4rofl:

 

gogo

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Good Friday is a silent day in my state: no dancing or parties allowed. Traditional fish is served. Our second daughter finally left hospital the day before (so I was able to upload the Waffenmeisterin dryad she was playing while at hospital). She is still not agile enough to jump and run and wanted to tell about all the stuff she had to undergo at hospital. So I took her for some fishing at a nearby lake which is owned by the local fishing club. We got 10 Elsässer Saibling, a sort of hybrid breeding of an artic charr and a red trout. Who ever told you you have to be silent while fishing, we got more than enough while talking.

 

I wanted to try a recipe from a video I saw a year ago. I did some changes because some of my daughters don't like certain herbs. We prepared half of the charrs for lunch as Saibling in Pergament (charr in parchment paper). You spray some olive oil on parchment papers, do a layer of 2 papers. You fill the charr with Kräuterbutter(butter mixed with spicing herbs). I use to lay some long leaves of beargarlic between the fish halves so the ends are visible. get some small tomatoes, some fine cut fresh young herbs (bear garlic is ripe her at the moment) and lay it around the fish. Then paper is rolled around and the ends tied. Half an our in the baking oven and served with potatoes in skin.

The paper is opened at the table, so it doesn't cooldown so quickly. When opening the nice smell leaves and I normally get real hungry when I see the fish 'swimming' in the herb butter. The advantage is that the juices stay inside the paper and the fish keeps its taste.

SaiblinginPergament_d0e946596d2d115d658b8b8946e4d21f_Forelle%20in%20Pergament%2001.jpg

The german video can be found here: first 90s is preparing the butter with herbs, then preparing the fish. I think even it is in german you get an idea how it is done.

german video: charr in pergament

 

We experimented with some other food prepared in paper, and it is easy to do after some failures. But failures can happen if you want to be creative.

 

So what is left: 5 elsac charrs. You can do them as trouts in your follow up recipe.

 

So left are 5 trouts.

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Awesome Chattius. I am on the last night of a fishing long weekend with my parents. We go for "Kurper"(tilapia) most of the time, but "swartbaars" (bass) when we get bored. We descale the fish, and fillet it ourselves (I do about 5 in the time that the others do 3). We prepare it in a very simple way usually. Dust it in a mixture of flour, salt, ground pepper, and I usually mix in some dried herbs(parsley, thyme, oregano). Straight from the flour into a hot pan wit a touch of oil. Grill skin side down for +- 4 min(depending on size) and turn over. Grill for another 3-4minutes. Serve with a dressing made with lemon juice, oilive oil, and finely chopped fennel leaves. It is delicious.

 

We have left over rump steak from last night. Any suggestions?

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Preparing a fish by putting it in sour milk and then adding flour is called Müllerin-Art in germany. Müllerin is wife of a miller, Art = a la. French name is à la meunière. French name some sauces à la meunière too, but in germany Müllerin-Art is sour milk and flour.

 

390px-Forelle_Müllerinart.JPG

 

It seems there are different names for the primal cuttings in english, american, german usage.

 

300px-Rind-Ganz.png

 

13 would be Hüfte. But even this Hüfte has diffrent parts, mainly because recipes got international now, european community tries an international naming, but old traditional recipes still have their old cut namings. When doing butchering at farm of my grandparents they had a name for each muscle of a cow. So the Hüfte can be Hüftsteak, Rumpsteak, Tafelspitz, ... Tafelspitz would be the part in next picture:

 

220px-Rind-Schwanzstück.png

 

A recipe for Tafelspitz can be found here:

http://www.wien.info/en/shopping-wining-dining/viennese-cuisine/recipes/tafelspitz

 

Living in an area with lot of fruit trees and wild herbs like horseradish we do it normaly to celebrate end of garden work in autumn and serve it with:

roasted mini potatoes (the smallest from garden which are too small for salade or to be stored over winter)

a mix of minced fallen fruits like pears, apples, Speierlinge

minced horseradish with Schmand (smetana, variant of sour cream).

 

We use the fruits which weren't picked but fallen from the trees (mainly because too high for ladders, decade old trees at hill sides). They are overripe and really sweet, but can't be stored and have to be used right away.

 

It looks much like the wiki picture, just that the roasted potatoes aren't cut:

 

300px-Tafelspitz.jpg

 

I still have several roots of horse-radish stored in our clay cellar, so continue with:

 

Horse radish

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Wow - this looks more promising than that old topic that Claire put on which end up discussing what to do with your motor-cycle-delivered-pizza left-overs.

 

This includes all the stuff like Shepherds (sorry gogo Sheppards) Pie, Cottage Pie, Rissoles, Bubble and Squeak ..... phew Chattius, is life long enough to cover what is in effect everyday cookery, more often than not without recipes and never-to-be- repeated-off-the-cuff cookery?

 

Will have to come back when I have read this properly and had time to think.

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Bread Soup - Brotsuppe

 

Probably allaround the world bread soup is made and never the same recipe. Different sort of bread, different preparation,... but the idea is allways the same : use up rests.

We do fresh bread ourself at the village owned baking house every 2 weeks when it is heated. We never know really how many we will need: Spme evenings the kids have friends with themat our house,then there are days when our kids are at friends, so it can happen that we have large amounts of not used sour dough bread,hardened and dried out.

 

The idea of a good bread soup is to add whatever is at home. Our second likes bread soup with liver-sausage best. I am more a fan of green back, our oldest prefers bread soup with eggs,...

 

So here the rests we used yesterday:

 

days old sour dough bread

Metzelsuppe - the water which was used to boil our self made sausages, including the pieces of damaged sausages (if none is damaged I damage some just to get a good Metzelsuppe). Very strong tasting soup. Metzelsuppe would translate as slaughtering-soup.

onions from garden with damaged skin - couldn't be stored for winter

some garden vegs- before nightfrosts kill them

 

Bread cut in small spieces, onions cut in rings, both fried in a pan. Put the pan and a pot with hot Metzelsuppe with added vegs on the table. Put some bread and onion on your plate, fill up with Metzelsuppe and you are done.

 

----

My favourite:

roast bread, onions and green back pieces fried in a pan. Instead Metzelsuppe I boil some pearl barley in bouillon.

 

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Favourite of our second:

bread and dusted onions fried, garden vegs added

150213-bigfix-brotsuppe.jpg

Then some rough-cut liver-sausage is cut in small pieces and boiled in bouillon. The saisage will break into finer pieces and will thicken the soup.

150330-bigfix-brotsuppe.jpg

Plate after fried onions/bread are covered with the soup

23510-bigfix-brotsuppe.jpg

 

What we had yesterday looked very similiar, just no pieces of sliced bread, but dices, and our sour-dough-bread is farmer's tradition and darker.

 

There is no need to throw old bread away.

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We had some left over risotto a few days back. We just warmed it up and finished eating it. 

We have some boerewors that we are going to cook for breakfast. Boere wors is a very traditional kind of sausage and is loved all over the country. It is seasoned with coriander seeds and most popular way is to "braai" it. Cooked on a grill over a wood fire. A supermarket chain here in south africa has a boerewors championship challenge every year. And the award is that they use your recipe for their boerewors that they sell. 

We want to start making our own sausages, we just need the casings.

We make our own mince now with the Kenwood and it is soooo much fun.

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Boerewors...

It would translate as Bauernwurst in German. Here it is a Bratwurst which is smoked for better storage. It won't be put on a grill but rather put in a soup.

We had a Bratwurst tread once and how to make your own. Electric grinder but manual sausage press. When I was a teenager I had to make the casings at house butchering at my grandparents. Emptying the intestines, filling with hot salt water, use a long smooth wooden pole to turn inside out, using a sharp knife to cut fat and falty parts away without making holes, check for bandworms and other parasites, ... :eek:

On a second thought you can probably buy the casings at a good butcher.

Closest to a Boerewors would probably be a Bratwurstschnecke (Schnecke = snail), using a Wildschwein (wild pig = boar) for a stronger taste.

 

bratwurstschnecke.jpg

 

 

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On 1/11/2020 at 3:23 AM, Delta! said:

We had some left over risotto a few days back. We just warmed it up and finished eating it. 

We have some boerewors that we are going to cook for breakfast. Boere wors is a very traditional kind of sausage and is loved all over the country. It is seasoned with coriander seeds and most popular way is to "braai" it. Cooked on a grill over a wood fire. A supermarket chain here in south africa has a boerewors championship challenge every year. And the award is that they use your recipe for their boerewors that they sell. 

We want to start making our own sausages, we just need the casings.

We make our own mince now with the Kenwood and it is soooo much fun.

I WISH i had a balcony... I would so love to master grilling skills... I'm envious of your environment... !

:drool:

gogo

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Are you really having problems getting sausage skins. Butchers here used to give miles and miles of them away for free. But since the EU in their wisdom produced rules which effectively closed down all the excellent small slaughter rooms that local butchers had, it has been more difficult. But our supermarkets are now selling them, more length that you could use in a lifetime for next to nothing. It is getting the end open and onto the nozzle of my sausage making pump-thing that nearly defeats my large hands. 

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