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Delta!

Frozen happiness!

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Delta!    370

For those of you who don't know yet, I absolutely looooovvvveeee cooking, so much so that I decided to become a chef. Now in a kitchen you have different chefs, for different food types. You typically get hot kitchen, preparing mostly main courses(meats, vegetables, starches), sauces, hot soups, etc. Cold kitchen, mainly prepare starters, salads, fruits, cold meat platters, cheese platter, cereals, cold soups, etc. My favourite department is PASTRY! Most institutions incorporate the bakery in pastry kitchens as well. Pastry chefs prepare different types of pastries(puff pastry, shortcrust pastry, strudel pastry, suet pastry, etc.) desserts, custards, tarts, flans pies(meat pies - hot kitchen might prepares the filling), and baking fresh breads, sourdough breads, brioche, buns, baguettes, muffins, scones. I have worked in 4,5 professional kitchens so far. 1,5 of them making their own frozen desserts (ice creams, sorbets, granita, frozen yoghurt). Last year I bought my own ice cream machine, and immediately started making my own ice creams and sorbet.

Now real French ice cream is custard based, meaning you make a light custard, with cream and/or milk, sugar and eggs(some recipes just call for yolks), and you flavour it. the flavours can be almost anything, alcohol, nuts, fruits, spices, artificial, herbs, vanilla pods, and never ending combinations of the above mentioned. the custard then has to be frozen and churned, the churning prevents large ice crystals from forming, and it incorporates air (also know as overrun) which is essential to prevent the ice cream from freezing rock solid (alcohol, sugar and air are 3 components that doesn't freeze and has to be taken into account when making ice cream). Commercial ice cream manufacturers typically make Philadelphia style ice cream, consisting of milk (or milk solids and liquids) sugar and flavouring, and they tend to abuse air, pump enough air into the mixture, and they can use less sugar, and one litre of milk will make much more ice cream. Proof, a 5L ice cream that you buy at the super market, weighs less than half of 5L ice cream that I make at the restuarant, melt 5L of commercial ice cream down and the container will have very little liquid in and a lot of foam. melt 5l ice cream that I make and you will get a little bit of foam, and about 3litres of liquid(depending on the flavour and/or the extra added stuff eg. fruit, nuts, etc.)

Sorbet, sherbet and granita can use the same base, fruit juice/pulp/flavoured liquid and sugar syrup(equal parts sugar and water, boiled). Sherbet can have cream, milk, buttermilk or egg whites added for extra smoothness. It is then churned in an ice cream machine, also to incorporate air and to prevent large ice crystals from forming. Granita is not churned, it is frozen in a shallow dish and broken up with a fork every now and then (most sources recommend every 30 min after the first crystal has started forming) and it must have a crunchy bite to it. Granita, sorbet and sherbets are often served between courses as a "palate refresher/cleanser".

Frozen yoghurt is yoghurt, plain or flavoured, extra sugar, to prevent solid freezing and flavouring. Churned in an ice cream machine to incorporate air and to prevent large ice crystals from forming.

Parfait is a combination of egg (whites and yolks seperate), stiff whipped cream, and flavouring(usually in a syrup form, but also common in a custard form; eggs, sugar, milk/cream and flavouring). The parfait recipe I learned says you "lighten" your flavouring by folding in a 3rd of the stiff whipped cream, and then folding in the rest of the cream, and whipping the egg white to stiff peaks as well and folding that into the mixture. Other recipes call only for whipped cream and no egg whites.

Frozen soufflé is made by lining a ramekin with baking paper/greaseproof paper so that a lot will be above the rim. then putting your mixture in making sure it is enough to stand out above the rim, once the paper is removed, this will give it the looks of a baked soufflé that rose above the rim.

Some of the interesting flavours of frozen desserts I have produced includes:
Ice creams: Almond and Amarula (an African fruit made into a delicious cream liquor).
Fig and brandy.
Double chocolate, it had wonderful bits of finely grated chocolate in and made all the girls weak in the knees. :blush:
Rum, date and pecan nut.
Vanilla, using the actual vanilla pod and seeds, made tiny black specks every where that confused people.
Fudge, made some fudge, melted some into the cream, and cut the rest into chunks that I mixed into the cold mixture.
Strawberry.
Black cherry and kircsh.
Pancake ice cream, was absolutely amazing.
Avocado ice cream.
Black pepper ice cream.
Thyme ice cream.
Fennel ice cream.
Aniseed ice cream.
Cinnamon ice cream.
Aioli ice cream.
Peanut butter, the only form of peanut butter I like, although certain brands makes the ice cream freeze rock hard


Sorbets: strawberries and cream, added the cream in the last 5minutes of churning
Kiwi, kiwi and basil.
Rooibos tea and honey.
Banana and butlers liquer.
Red grape and rose champagne.
Peach and apricot.
Orange and mint, was one of the most refreshing ones.
Pine apple and tarragon.
Orange and tarragon.
Strawberry and black pepper.
Apple
Melon
Mango
Guava
Dark chocolate sorbet
Jager bomb granita


Frozen yoghurt: pickled ginger, will go very well with sushi or as a palate cleanser
peach and custard.

And now I would like to know(for market research and just for interest sake). What is your favourite flavours of ice cream/sorbet/frozen yoghurt and the most interesting/bizzare one you have tasted?

Edited by Delta!

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chattius    734

Aspirin = Meadowsweet

I don't know if meadowsweet is growing in africa. It is a wild good tasting herb here. The most used of its many german names is Mädesüss. It was used by the germans to sweeten(süss) and aromize mead (Met, honey wine). I use it normally to put aroma to my self made fruit wines. A very popular usage in my area is to put the blossoms of the plant into cream and let it stay for half a day. Then you filter the blossoms aways and the cream got a nice taste of vanille/honey/almond. You can use the cream for ice, cookies, roasted beef, ...

The old name for meadowsweet was Spiraea ulmaria. Aspirin was named after the Acetyl group of the Spirin (which they though was the drug part of the plant). So it is funny that the old germans were drinking a mead/honey wine which had already aspirin in it (no headaches after a hangover?).

So an easy ice is just using cream which was aromized with mainly meadowsweet and few other blossoms of herbs. Blossoms filtered away before icing. At a restaurant you often find small caramalized herb flowers on the ice.

 

Chocolade Chilli

I have no ice machine, but the mix my brother used at his last birthday party and which I liked:

heat till start to boil

  1. 50g chocolade (75+% cacao)
  2. 1 little chilli (not to hot, fine stripes)
  3. 250 ml cream
  4. 500 ml milk

 

Whip till creamy:

  1. 6 yolks from eggs
  2. 150 g sugar

Mix and whip while cooling, fill in the ice machine.

 

Woodruff

Woodruff is called Waldmeister (forest master) in germany. It is poisonous so probably forbidden to be used in restaurants? But it is traditional used for ice, may wine, beer, ... her in germany

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essjayehm    43

And now I would like to know(for market research and just for interest sake). What is your favourite flavours of ice cream/sorbet/frozen yoghurt and the most interesting/bizzare one you have tasted?

As a general rule, I prefer mint ice cream with chocolate chips/chunks.

 

Sorbets / Frozen yoghurt - I like all the crazy-looking types, all about the same amount so... depends on how I feel at the time!

 

I have stayed far, far away from interesting/bizarre desserts as a rule (don't want to ruin an entire meal with a "bad" dessert), so I cannot say I've ever tried any of the "black pepper" or other strange dessert combinations. I have heard they are good, though... so someday I may get adventuresome and try one of 'em.

 

ROFL edit: I put "fruit" with a "Y" on the end... where it has the (now-funny) crazy-looking substitution... and it prompted an out-loud laugh and now my co-workers want to know what was so funny :)

F-R-U-I-T-Y is a bad word? In some contexts, I would agree...

Edited by essjayehm

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gogoblender    1,465

Theuns, this is a magnificent article you wrote up! I have to ask first...how fast do you type! :bounce: I'll always make time in my day for some parfaits, granitas and anything sweet...but my favorite will always come down to the ice cream. I have to be careful because of the sugars, but when someone has a great flavor it's hard to say no.

 

I hope you've saved some of that Amarula ice cream for me, I'm a fan of the liqueur, maybe because of the elephants on the bottle? And , now this idea has come to me after seeing Chattiu's comments about chilli chocolate...

 

I think the day has dawned for a chilli chocolate ice cream!

 

:chef:

 

gogo

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Delta!    370

Theuns, this is a magnificent article you wrote up! I have to ask first...how fast do you type! :bounce: I'll always make time in my day for some parfaits, granitas and anything sweet...but my favorite will always come down to the ice cream. I have to be careful because of the sugars, but when someone has a great flavor it's hard to say no.

 

I hope you've saved some of that Amarula ice cream for me, I'm a fan of the liqueur, maybe because of the elephants on the bottle? And , now this idea has come to me after seeing Chattiu's comments about chilli chocolate...

 

I think the day has dawned for a chilli chocolate ice cream!

 

:chef:

 

gogo

 

Thank you gogo! I forgot to mention. In pastry kitchen, the frozen desserts are my all time favourite. Can't imagine EVER get sick of making them or eating them for that matter.

 

I don't type particularly fast, why? But I got pretty good practise while working for my sister, making out of invoices, ordering stock over I.M services and sending emails, typing became like 2cnd nature to me.

 

You do need some sweet goodness in your day gogo, so save all of that for Ice creams, parfaits, sorbets and granitas.

 

The almond and Amarula ice cream is finished at the moment, but I can easily make more, just need the ingredients.

 

oh and an update,

I recently made more flavours:

Custard Ice cream, (UltraMel (boxed custard) is very popular in SA, and it taste similiar to my milktart creme pat, so I just played around a bit more, added a can of condensed milk, and voila, delicious custard ice cream)

coconut sorbet (used coconut milk and added some toasted desiccated coconut as well)

Cucumber sorbet that I made at Roots during the interview. They add gelatin to their sorbets as a stabiliser, and to prevent the sorbet melting to quickly.

 

I'll try the chillie chocolate ice cream and post the result as soon as I've done it

Edited by Delta!

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chattius    734

Delta, have you ever tried ice with yolk from eggs which weren't chicken: like geese, quails, ... At easter we run out of normal eggs (they are turned into easter-eggs) while our geese start to lay eggs. The quails are busy laying the whole year anyway.

 

Geese eggs have a more intensive taste, less wheat more herbs eaten,so I wonder if they could be used for vegetables ice like garlic or bear garlic ice variants. I was thinking of thin slices of salmon wrapped-around/filled-with a beargarlic ice. I know we hessians are feared for our barbaric taste ;)

 

But before I get lynched by my family or I poison them, do you know an existing recipe I could base on?

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Delta!    370

Delta, have you ever tried ice with yolk from eggs which weren't chicken: like geese, quails, ... At easter we run out of normal eggs (they are turned into easter-eggs) while our geese start to lay eggs. The quails are busy laying the whole year anyway.

 

Geese eggs have a more intensive taste, less wheat more herbs eaten,so I wonder if they could be used for vegetables ice like garlic or bear garlic ice variants. I was thinking of thin slices of salmon wrapped-around/filled-with a beargarlic ice. I know we hessians are feared for our barbaric taste ;)

 

But before I get lynched by my family or I poison them, do you know an existing recipe I could base on?

 

 

I've never tried making Ice cream with other eggs, it should work fine! the recipe that I use at home, (I'm not allowed to give the restaurants recipe, but they are similar). My recipe is better and cheaper on the wallet

 

1L milk

1L cream

6 whole eggs (each egg weighing +- 53g, so you can replace the eggs with the same weight of goose/quail eggs)

320g sugar.

flavouring (if using alcohol flavouring, let some alcohol evaporate out, otherwise it throws the sugar out of balance and makes a syrup that leaks out the whole time)

Bring the cream, milk, sugar and flavouring to boil, stir to make sure the sugar dissolves. break the eggs into a big enough container. Once the cream boils, temper it into the eggs (pour in a slow steady stream while constantly whisking the eggs to prevent it from curdling/forming scrambled eggs). churn in an ice cream machine/ put it in the freezer and stir vigorously every 20min.

 

Something like the avocado ice cream uses a different recipe because of the natural oils in avo.

8 medium - large avocados

2L cream

6 eggs (each egg weighing +- 53g)

20ml lemon juice

1teaspoon white pepper

400g sugar

pinch of salt

200+ ml apple juice

cut the avo into small chunks, bring the apple juice and lemon juice to boiling point and add the avo, (this prevents it from discolouring and keeps it nice and green). puree the mixture. and add the white pepper.

bring the cream, salt and sugar to boiling point, and temper into the eggs, add the avo puree. churn in an ice cream machine/ put it in the freezer and stir vigorously every 20min.

 

If you can't freeze everything at once, then contact cover it with glad wrap/plastic wrap to prevent a skin from forming. (the wrap should touch the custard) and put it in the fridge to start cooling down

 

 

I don't think you should use other eggs only for "savoury" ice creams, it will give a richer taste to the ice cream, since geese eggs have a slightly higher fat content eg.

 

If you try it out please let me know how it came out.

And sorry for the late reply, internet at home was down, posts in related word game was done from my phone.

 

The chilli chocolate Ice cream will have to wait a little while, we are closing the restaurant for a week over easter, and I'll prefer to use couverture chocolate for the best result, which I can only get from work.

Edited by Delta!

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chattius    734

At easter I will do at least one real Woodruff ice. The wild plants are just the right age now (as soon as blossoms appear it is too old and contains too much of unwanted stuff=coumarin). Woodruff contains the same stuff as cinnamon, so preparing wild woodruff for selling is not allowed in germany anymore. Probably town people never learned to use it savely. But our region is used to it for centuries and preparing it the right way it is okay if you don't eat it each day.

Since we don't have an ice machine we do the ice the classical way: thin layer of ice mix on a cooled down plate and moving downside up as soon tze downside is frozen a bit. I found some photos which may describe it. I don't decorate with young woodruff plants as in last picture, too dangerous with small kids at table.

 

249100-bigfix-waldmeistereis.jpg109155-bigfix-waldmeistereis.jpg109154-bigfix-waldmeistereis.jpg

 

Some known german drinks which originally had Woodruff (we call it Waldmeister= Forest Master):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maiwein

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berliner_Weisse

 

I still do original may-wine when we do our 'dance into the may' at firefighters. Traditionaly last of april is a dance meeting at village and the firefighting building is the largest one when the trucks are moved out. Since the may wine is not sold but people put an amount of money into the firefighter supporting moneybox it is okay I think :)

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Delta!    370

interesting stuff Chattius, but I need to ask, what is so bad about the coumarin?

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chattius    734

Is is said to result in a higher cancer risc. The problem is that animals tests may not give correct results.

 

The coumarin in plants creates a satiated feeling in big plant eaters so they stop eating even still hungry.

 

The lethal dosis varies extremely depending which animal was used for tests, so health laws do the lowest risc way and forbid the use. The human body seems to change it into something way less harmful, but most of the tests were done with european people. There are theories that similiar to milk allergy people in areas with wild woodruff built a resistance because of a mutation. But others says coumarin is in many plants all over the world, so probably all humans change it into something with a smaller toxity. But the tests started just a few years ago and until they are finished the ban on woodruff is still on.

 

Cinnamon bark is similiar,one of the several plants used for it has to be carefully prepared.

 

For woodruff, take young plants and filter the plants away before icing or making may wine seems to be okay. Using it only few celebrations days a year I think I can savely do it.

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gogoblender    1,465

The chilli chocolate Ice cream will have to wait a little while, we are closing the restaurant for a week over easter, and I'll prefer to use couverture chocolate for the best result, which I can only get from work.

 

I'm very excited about this. In fact, if something as wonderfully exotic as Chilli Chocolate Ice cream is possible (I think I've fallen in love with the alliterative qualities of just the title ) AND tastes good, I may even want to pick up an ice cream maker. Do you think it's worthwhile? Also is it possible to make home made ice cream without too much sugar?

:)

 

gogo

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Delta!    370

The chilli chocolate Ice cream will have to wait a little while, we are closing the restaurant for a week over easter, and I'll prefer to use couverture chocolate for the best result, which I can only get from work.

 

I'm very excited about this. In fact, if something as wonderfully exotic as Chilli Chocolate Ice cream is possible (I think I've fallen in love with the alliterative qualities of just the title ) AND tastes good, I may even want to pick up an ice cream maker. Do you think it's worthwhile? Also is it possible to make home made ice cream without too much sugar?

:)

 

gogo

 

 

mmmm. ice cream with less sugar?

You can use honey as a substitute: "Honey is a slightly acidic ingredient, and in custard based recipes that call for a significant amount of it, you'll be directed to warm the honey seperately and then add it later. Honey based ice creams will have a smoother texture due to high concentrations of sugars." Although it doesn't specify the ratio to use honey:sugar, I will suggest 3parts honey to 4parts sugar in weight.

 

Corn syrup, which is just an inverted sugar. I have read about it in my cookbooks, but I have never used it before (it seems to be an American thing) but you can also use liquid glucose, in a 1:1 weight ratio. it will have the same effect on the texture and scoopability as honey, because it has a higher concentration of sugars, but the flavour shouldn't change.

 

And then the last do-able method for home made ice creams ALCOHOL! :drinks:

It performs 2 roles in ice creams, it prevents ice creams and sorbets from freezing to hard, and it provides flavour!

adding just a little bit can give it a softer texture. for fruit based recipes, use spirits like kirsch, vodka, Gin or eau-de-vie, this will enhance the flavour and produce a softer texture.

45ml of 40% liquor, such as rum and whiskey for 1l of custard or sorbet mixture. CAUTION! if you use too much, you will be left with a runny mess.

 

The other possible way is to do what commercial ice cream companies do, pump in air. if you use enough air, you can leave sugar out all together(although the Ice cream won't be sweet), and the flavour will be very diluted, and it might bloat your stomach if you swallow spoons full of air!

 

Delta! :chef:

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chattius    734

It's rhubarb time, rhubarb crumb yeast dough cake and now rhubarb ice. My brother was experimenting with Rhubarb ice, a rather fresh/sour taste.

 

Make a rhubarb compote first:

Take 4 rods of rhubarb. First skin the rhubarb, remove all the long fibres and cut it in tiny quarters. Add 50-75 gramm sugar and boil it to compote. (tastes good with some vanilla and together with potatoe pancakes too)

 

Whip 0.2 litres aromized whipping cream (my brother used the meadowsweet from a few articles before to do it, alternativly add some fresh vanilla).

 

Mix 0.1l milk, 0.1litre Schmand(smetana, sour cream variant with 20% fat), 0.04l crème de cassis (to turn the lightly brown-red colour into a more appetizing red) and the compote.

Carefully add the whipped cream to this mix without destroying the volume.

 

Put in the icing machine.

 

Hope I translated everything correct.

 

P.S.: tried the Choco Chili already?

Edited by chattius

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chattius    734

I found a quick way to do something like chili-chocolade ice:

 

Lindt (the swiss Lindt invented the chocolade machine and founded a company) does a chocolade made from 70% cacao which is filled with mouse au chocolat, and a yelly from grenadines(pomegranate?) and chili. Just eat it ice cold from the refridgerator and le tit melt in your mouth- yummy. Prices are around 5 euro for a 2*150gramm package. They do several chili chocolade mixes as I found out friday evening visiting a delicatess store, but the ones with black cherry yelly were sold out. My wife was the opinion that I should buy some good white wine because she didn't know if the parents of the kids at our say-thanks-party would like self-made fruit wine.

 

49333263.jpg

 

What are your experiences with chili-chocolade ice, tried it ?

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Delta!    370

No I'm gonna try it this week, I've been swamped at work with full bookings the past 2 weeks.

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gogoblender    1,465

I found a quick way to do something like chili-chocolade ice:

 

Lindt (the swiss Lindt invented the chocolade machine and founded a company) does a chocolade made from 70% cacao which is filled with mouse au chocolat, and a yelly from grenadines(pomegranate?) and chili. Just eat it ice cold from the refridgerator and le tit melt in your mouth- yummy. Prices are around 5 euro for a 2*150gramm package. They do several chili chocolade mixes as I found out friday evening visiting a delicatess store, but the ones with black cherry yelly were sold out. My wife was the opinion that I should buy some good white wine because she didn't know if the parents of the kids at our say-thanks-party would like self-made fruit wine.

 

49333263.jpg

 

What are your experiences with chili-chocolade ice, tried it ?

 

WOWOAH

 

somebody send this to me ...pleeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeze!

 

:bounce:

 

gogo

 

p.s. Theuns, hope yer doing okay with the work pressure... restos can get pretty hard on the soul fast.

Repeated dosings of Ice cream is key. Remember that :P

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Delta!    370

 

p.s. Theuns, hope yer doing okay with the work pressure... restos can get pretty hard on the soul fast.

Repeated dosings of Ice cream is key. Remember that :P

 

 

Work pressure is going alright, If I may quote Bilbo Baggins, " I feel like butter, scraped over to much bread.... I still enjoy cooking the whole day it, and probably will continue enjoying it. But since the starter chef left, I had too take over a lot of his work as well, especially during service time, amuse bouche, bread, and starters are my responsibility now, and I help out with more of the main courses, and I still do all of the desserts myself. At least I'm still young and tend to be full of energy. Bookings for the rest of this week seems hectic as well.

I'll just push through. I still love my job and will stay commited.

 

We finally changed 2 of the desserts, I'm glad about that! crepez suzette served with cinnamon ice cream, and a baked brandy pudding, served with vanilla ice cream and nut brittle. I'm busy twisting the head chefs arm so that we can change the chocolate fondant to another chocolate dessert. just have to think of the perfect one that they will like, and the creme brulee will forever be on the menu, as it it our signature dessert.

 

 

Delta!

Edited by Delta!

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gogoblender    1,465

 

I'll just push through. I still love my job and will stay commited.

 

We finally changed 2 of the desserts, I'm glad about that! crepez suzette served with cinnamon ice cream, and a baked brandy pudding, served with vanilla ice cream and nut brittle. I'm busy twisting the head chefs arm so that we can change the chocolate fondant to another chocolate dessert. just have to think of the perfect one that they will like, and the creme brulee will forever be on the menu, as it it our signature dessert.

 

 

Delta!

 

Bravo with sticking to it! And an even bigger bravo with mention of the delicious cinnamon ice cream ^^ I've been a bit under the weather for two days now, but reading your post has enlivened my blood.

 

Yay sugar, ice cream and creme brulee!

 

:bounce:

 

gogo

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Delta!    370

2 new flavours that I have made.

Goats cheese and honey ice cream.

persimmon and cinnamon frozen yoghurt.

Both delicious

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cider_steve    26

Great thread, thanks for sharing.

 

I was on holiday a few weeks back in Dartmouth (Devon) and found a place that did some wonderful icecream and sorbet.

 

Not having had sorbet since a child, I was chuffed at discovering this place.

 

The two flavours I took to were lemon and orange.

 

Wow, delicious and so refreshing. I couldn't get enough.

 

Not many places do sorbet around here, but I'll keep looking.

 

Cheers,

 

Steve. :)

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chattius    734

Currently Renekloden (french Reine Claude = Queen Claude, english greengages) are ripe, around 200pounds of fruits.

 

220px-Prunus_Grosse-Gruene-Reneklode.JPG

 

so we tried a sorbet:

 

1000g real ripe Renekloden

0,25 litre sparkling wine

250g sugar

the inner parts of 3 vanilla fruits

some fine pieces of a citrone skin removed with a rasp

 

Nice yellow-green colour, fitting for summer

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Delta!    370

Currently Renekloden (french Reine Claude = Queen Claude, english greengages) are ripe, around 200pounds of fruits.

 

220px-Prunus_Grosse-Gruene-Reneklode.JPG

 

so we tried a sorbet:

 

1000g real ripe Renekloden

0,25 litre sparkling wine

250g sugar

the inner parts of 3 vanilla fruits

some fine pieces of a citrone skin removed with a rasp

 

Nice yellow-green colour, fitting for summer

 

 

oooh sounds yummy chattius! how did it come out? if it freezes to hard, you can let it melt down, add some sugar syrup(equal parts watter and sugar brought to boiling point)/honey, glucose, cornsyrup or a bit more alcohol.

 

Delta!

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Delta!    370

We made 2 new flavours at the restaurant.

White chocolate sorbet, I don't usually like white chocolate (couverture chocolate is very good though) but the white chocolate sorbet was delicious. we served it with a "chocolate compilation" on Bastille say.

the other flavour is Speculoos Ice cream, and it is just too good, my knees starts shaking and I get light headed every time I taste it. :Just_Cuz_21: One of the waiters said eating that is better than jumping in bed with her boyfriend... shame poor guy! we serve it with the Apple tarts for dessert.

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cider_steve    26

We made 2 new flavours at the restaurant.

White chocolate sorbet, I don't usually like white chocolate (couverture chocolate is very good though) but the white chocolate sorbet was delicious. we served it with a "chocolate compilation" on Bastille say.

the other flavour is Speculoos Ice cream, and it is just too good, my knees starts shaking and I get light headed every time I taste it. :Just_Cuz_21: One of the waiters said eating that is better than jumping in bed with her boyfriend... shame poor guy! we serve it with the Apple tarts for dessert.

 

Pardon my ignorance, but what is/are speculoos please ? (sounds like some one dropped thier glasses down the toilet !)

 

Steve.

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Delta!    370

We made 2 new flavours at the restaurant.

White chocolate sorbet, I don't usually like white chocolate (couverture chocolate is very good though) but the white chocolate sorbet was delicious. we served it with a "chocolate compilation" on Bastille say.

the other flavour is Speculoos Ice cream, and it is just too good, my knees starts shaking and I get light headed every time I taste it. :Just_Cuz_21: One of the waiters said eating that is better than jumping in bed with her boyfriend... shame poor guy! we serve it with the Apple tarts for dessert.

 

Pardon my ignorance, but what is/are speculoos please ? (sounds like some one dropped thier glasses down the toilet !)

 

Steve.

 

HAHAHAHA, it has nothing to do with eyesight or bathrooms!

 

here is the wiki link

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speculaas

We use the paste form, 170g to 1litre of cream. Although it is quite expensive, costing R 50-00 for a 350g bottle, and we can only order it from our "specialty foods suppliers", I have never seen the cookies/biscuits in South African supermarkets.

 

Delta!

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