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RAD Community Sacred 3 Preview

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Gogo asked whether I could translate one of the german previews.

Because I didn't know whether they were okay with just copying and translating their work, we decided to go with my own preview, which I wrote for the RAD Community (http://rad-community.org).

I had the opporunity, along with some other folks of the community, to get to see one of the presentations of the game behind closed doors at gamescom.

Dark, from the GSF / DS forums, who was also there for the presentation, did most of the translation, so credit goes to him as well :)

Beware, though, wall of text ahead!

 

Enjoy ...

 

---

 

GamesCom. Thursday, 6pm local time. In a few moments, we will be some of the first to see Sacred 3 in action. The long awaited, desired (and, in some cases, thought dead) sequel to the Sacred series of video games.

 

There's no business like ... video games business

As arranged with Kerstin Brüggemeier (DeepSilver's German "Online Communication", and thus, more or less, our CM), we arrived punctual at the DeepSilver booth in the business area. In stark contrast to the general bigger-louder-more-colorful booths in the entertainment area, booths in the business area are all white, silent, closed doors. This is where business is made.

Inside, a lounge was waiting for us. At noon, delicious sandwiches were waiting for hungry businessmen, and cold drinks are available all day long. A relaxed and welcoming atmosphere, compared to the stressful and crowdy rest of the convention.

But we are not here to rest, we are here to get information. Aside from us (moderators from the German S1/2 forums), there were two more mods from the DeepSilver forums, as well as two people from the Sacred Legends community. And another old face who opened the door to the presentation room: Sebastion "Buddy" Fleer.

 

Old friends

Buddy, who worked for Ascaron/Studio II, and was already responsible for Sacred 2, is now a producer for DeepSilver. The other two people in the room are Alex Toplansky, Creative Producer, and Prachya "Isaac" Prakhen, Senior Creative Producer. All three are working on Sacred Citadel and Sacred 3. Parakhen was a Creative Producer on Sacred2 as well.

 

Then the presentation starts, Sacred Citadel is shown. Since it's the same version that could also be played in the entertainment area, and we have done so thorougly, it's nothing new. It seems to be a nice way of spending time, but nothing we haven't seen before.

After that, it gets interesting. The big screen changes to a PS3 menu. Toplansky, who leads the presentation, explaines to us that the PS3 is the lead plattform. The reasons for this decision are mainly the difficulty of programming for the Cell processor, and the (nowadays) lackluster hardware. This way, by having the hardest plattform to develop for as lead, a better quality can be assured for other plattforms. However, we still have to see how this decision will influence the PC version concerning graphics and controls. They promised us that they are still working on the PC controls.

 

Changes

While Toplansky is talking about the game, Parakhen and Buddy demonstrate it. The known characters for now are a mighty Safiri-Warrior, who also plays a pivotal role as a player character in Sacred Citadel, and the Ancarian Lancer. The camera is isometric, but at certain points of interest zooms in to highlight the background, or your next goal, etc. There seems to be no manual control as in Sacred 2, though.

Other things have changed, too. Ancaria is now home to many different cultures and races, such as the previously mentioned Safiri tribe. They are a conglomeration of pirates, seafarers, and merchants who revere the sun and gather their powers from it.

These different cultures lead to disputes between each other, but there is something to unite them: The Ashen Wars, lead by the Ashen empire against everybody else.

The world itself has changed in the 1000 years since Sacred 1/Underworld, too. According to Toplansky, there will still be recognisable places (such as the ruins of Braverock castle) that will be visited throughout the game.

In the course of the level, Buddy and Parakhen slay through hordes of groups of smaller enemies, smart fiends that try to use their shield strategically (being only able to be damaged from behind), and Grimmoc shamans that buff everything that is out to kill you. Each fight has its own little strategic value, and button mashing often isn't the best option.

These fights also go to show how much emphasis Sacred 3 puts on coop. While one player distracts the groups of enemies, the other may run around them and attack their (weaker protected) back side. The battle system, as far as we cam tell, is more direct than before. Position is important, parts of the world can be used as traps to hurt enemies or to hide from projectiles/push an enemy group back into a choke point to fight them one by one. It is heavy on lots of flashy action, which is not a bad thing.

The level design is nice to look at and constructed to boost the replay value. Each mission has multiple paths how it can be solved. These paths, according to Toplansky, don't only differ in which way you're going, but also in enemies and loot. Some paths are filled with small hordes of enemies, while others may lead to a big boss fight or a fun-to-watch blender trap.

 

Not all that glitters is Sacred

This already shows some very fundamental changes in what defines Sacred. There is no open world anymore. The "world" and the story are divided into small segments, which are completed in missions. The missions can be solved in different ways, but aside from this branching, the way is still somewhat straightforward.

Gone with the big, open world is also a noticable part of playing together; Only 4 people may be in the same game. Some missions require two or more players, and if you don't have enough friends, you will get AI companies to be able to still proceed. It is unknown if/how much you can control the AI, how many mission will require them, or how many AI companions you will get if you don't have a full game already.

 

Buddy and Parakhen continue slaying hordes of enemies. The lancer uses a spell to knock over the big grimmocs, after which the warrior unleashes a jump attack, landing with the blade of his mighty axe in the fallen grimmoc. All in all, it looks very satisfying.

The presentation already gives a good impression of Sacred 3's graphical capability. The animations are fluid, and the effects are nice to watch and fitting for a Hack'n'Slay. The level is designed with a special care for the fine details, and everything that can influence the battle has benn well designed.

It was not long before we reached the end of the presentation. Another indicator that the game will make time go by quite fast.

At the end of the mission, there is a breakdown of player success - most actions within the mission are rewarded with points, and each player can compare their achieved rank with that of their friends. Extra points are rewarded for coop actions.

Picked up loot can be evalueted, equipped or sold in the places called hubs, before/after every mission. It's not possible to do so while on a mission - the developers think that it would be too distracting from the essential, which is slaying lots of things with style. The same goes for Combat Arts - you cannot change them in missions, you can only pick two of your CAs beforehand. The reason for this strongly limited customization is, according to the producers, to keep the player from feeling overpowered.

 

Conclusion

Sacred 3 looks nice, seems to be enjoyable to play, and will bring many gamers joy. But the legacy of its predecessors is mostly ignored and can only be seen in bits and pieces here and there. Most things that made a Sacred a Sacred game have changed for Sacred 3. It is still a Hack'n'Slay, but it will not fit the expectations of old fans. Too heavy is the lack of an open world, the limited multiplayer, the mutilated character skill customization, etc.

 

Sacred 3 deserves a fair chance. But it will have a hard time convincing people that it is indeed a Sacred game, rather than just a random game with the name and the story slapped on.

 

It is still up in the air how the opinions about the game will change in the course of the future. There are still some big questions (sometimes intentionally) left open: How will character development work, which will be the other available characters, how will the MP work regarding open and/or closed net, and, of course: Will there be a playable Seraphim character?

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Thanks for that, Birne. You've given a balanced view of what the game is and isn't. I will still get S3, even though I am likely to be amongst those who will reminisce for the old days. I will look to future announcements though to see if my opinion changes.

Edited by Steerpike1

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Yeah, very nice writeup.

 

"The reason for this strongly limited customization is, according to the producers, to keep the player from feeling overpowered."

 

:o <-- Me left speechless. In what world does that logic make sense. Games like these (if not most games in general) should exactly be about feeling overpowered - without actually being so.

 

Edit:

"The reasons for this decision are mainly the difficulty of programming for the Cell processor, and the (nowadays) lackluster hardware. This way, by having the hardest plattform to develop for as lead, a better quality can be assured for other platforms."

It does seem to be true that PS3 is by far the hardest platform to develop for. But I cant get my head around how developing primarily for the hardest platform would increase the quality for other platforms. Wouldn't it rather keep the quality back for those platforms, due to potential programming limitations when their team struggles with the PS3.

I am not sure there has ever been made a port from console games, which did not suffer from it, in any case. Of course one could argue the same is true from PC to console, so it is probably just a matter of something which benefit some people and hurt others, depending on their platform.

Edited by Shadout

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I might need to get into that a little:

 

The fights in Sacred3 are designed to be more tactical and direct. Having only 2 CAs available at a time makes it necessary to think ahead before a mission. Some CAs might work perfect for some creeps but fail when confronted with others. Having the ability to just switch CAs like it was in Sacred 1 or 2 enables the player to just correct these disadvantages. I guess that is what the producers meant. You have to think ahead and if you thought wrong, you can't just - overpowered by being able to switch CAs - kill them easily anyway.

So while being more powerfull than the monsters around, you still can't just go on every mission without taking at least a little time in between.

Plus, there are different ways to each mission which might require different CAs to be completetd.

 

As for the PS3 as lead. I think you're right. The PC will suffer from this way of developing. It's just a matter of how much ...

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I wonder, how will you know what to expect from a mission before starting it. If you don't know what the next mission might bring of challenges, thinking ahead won't be possible.

 

If you get no inforation pre-mission, "Guessing wrong" could be highly annoying in Hardcore mode (if such even exists) if the balance is purely rock-paper-scissors based.

 

I remember that Spore A-RPG some time ago, while it failed pretty hard, it tried those closed mission-based challenges. And each time before you started, it gave you an overview of the types of challenges to expect - giving you some of the information needed for picking your skills. On the other hand that simply results in "picking the correct skills for the current task", which is hardly tactical nor very interesting.

 

 

I'm all for not being able to switch skills in the middle of combat, or even quickly outside of combat. However I don't see how they couldn't achieve a goal of tactical and balanced combat with 4+ combat arts at a time. Being stuck with 4 or 5 (like Sacred 2) for a mission would be very much in the spirit of Sacred 2 - even with the reduced permanency of the choices.

And more importantly, offer a bit more variation than I can imagine 2 Combat Arts will be able to.

 

Now of course if it turns out we can directly or even indirectly control the 3 AI characters, essentially giving us 8 Combat Arts at a time, then it is a whole other matter. Though it would still be bad for co-op. Which would of course be very much against their stated goal with co-op being the primary focus..

 

On the other hand it sounds really positive about more tactical gameplay - something I was really looking forward to in Diablo 3 as well - and something that game even partially delivered on. 2 CAs sounds way too limited for ever achieving tactical combat however.

Edited by Shadout

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So then, does this mean Sacred 3 is going to be a linear kind of game where you go through missions sequentially - as opposed to S1 or Sacred 2 where you could do things in whatever order you liked?

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Thanks for the preview/translate :)

 

Well, it sounds like theres alot changed in how S3 plays. I really do hope that it isn't all bad, but it does seem like the feel of sacred that we really love isn't there...

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Thanks Birne, great write up :thumbsup:

 

I really like the sound of some things but am struggling not to feel disappointed with others.

 

The best things about Sacred for me was being able to go where you want, with whoever you want and do whatever you want. If you want to organise a mass team hunting in the spider desert then you could. If you wanted to go explore the lava region on your own, then you could. Yes, as you levelled some of the early regions became under levelled but the progression made sense and you could wait for the next difficulty and start exploring the starter areas again.

 

I just don't understand the decision of locking the world :Just_Cuz_21: . Has anybody ever said "I hate being able to go all over the map in Sacred, I wish they would lock it to be mission based"?

 

I also hate being forced into teams to complete parts of the game, even if it is AI. The choice of teaming up is great and can being fun when you want to but don't force me to do it just to get through a part of the game.

 

The game does look beautiful though (trying to be optimistic) :P

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The thing that's most disappointing to me too is the lack of open world. I would spend so many hours in Sacred 2 just looking around and finding new places. Sigh. I'll still buy it, but at least I know now to have different expectations for it.

I'm sure it'll be good in its own way, and maybe it was too hopeful of us to get an Ascaron-esque game not made by Ascaron.

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As said before, I'm wondering where the new designers got this feedback from. I've certainly not heard anyone say "It's too open, please make it more linear so I don't get lost". Or "Please make it episodic, rather than a continuous story".

 

I also have a feeling we're going to only have four characters as well, but there we go.

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No open world? Only 2 Combat Arts? What have they done :cry:

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The only reason I can think of for having some feedback after each mission is to enable you to re-start it with more information so you can choose what CAs you use more effectively. That said, I think having separate screens break up the combat is a bad idea on top of another bad idea (no open world). Generally devs don't want combat broken up too much.

 

I do like the sound of the more tactical combat & I hope CAs can be combined more effectively in S3. I'm always reminded of Dragon Age Origins whenever I think of this, casting an oil slick on the floor, then setting it on fire, that is what Combos should always have been, not a macro to let you fire off multiple CAs in one go.

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I do like the sound of the more tactical combat & I hope CAs can be combined more effectively in S3. I'm always reminded of Dragon Age Origins whenever I think of this, casting an oil slick on the floor, then setting it on fire, that is what Combos should always have been, not a macro to let you fire off multiple CAs in one go.

Oh yes!

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Wow guess this won't be the Sacred I know in anything but name. I knew there would be some major differences since a new developer was making it but I thought it would retain some semblance of the 1st two. Guess I'll have to look at it as an entirely new game and not an extension of a series.

 

It's almost like watching the sequel of one of your favorite movies but the entire cast/storyline changed. Gonna be hard to keep an open mind about this.

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Long as its not like DS3, also not sharing the same screen.

 

Open World, maybe they mean like they will be loading times, but if the worlds are big like Borderlands, where the maps are big different areas then I am fine with that, long as players and split and also have big maps like borderlands, then I am all for it.

 

Still it will be nice to have a hub to meet other players to pick to coop instead of having to log out of the game just to send an invite.

 

I dont know if this is new or not but....

 

sacred3_art1.jpg

Edited by Nervusbreakdown

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Gogo asked whether I could translate one of the german previews.

Because I didn't know whether they were okay with just copying and translating their work, we decided to go with my own preview, which I wrote for the RAD Community (http://rad-community.org).

I had the opporunity, along with some other folks of the community, to get to see one of the presentations of the game behind closed doors at gamescom.

Dark, from the GSF / DS forums, who was also there for the presentation, did most of the translation, so credit goes to him as well :)

Beware, though, wall of text ahead!

 

Enjoy ...

 

---

 

GamesCom. Thursday, 6pm local time. In a few moments, we will be some of the first to see Sacred 3 in action. The long awaited, desired (and, in some cases, thought dead) sequel to the Sacred series of video games.

 

There's no business like ... video games business

As arranged with Kerstin Brüggemeier (DeepSilver's German "Online Communication", and thus, more or less, our CM), we arrived punctual at the DeepSilver booth in the business area. In stark contrast to the general bigger-louder-more-colorful booths in the entertainment area, booths in the business area are all white, silent, closed doors. This is where business is made.

Inside, a lounge was waiting for us. At noon, delicious sandwiches were waiting for hungry businessmen, and cold drinks are available all day long. A relaxed and welcoming atmosphere, compared to the stressful and crowdy rest of the convention.

But we are not here to rest, we are here to get information. Aside from us (moderators from the German S1/2 forums), there were two more mods from the DeepSilver forums, as well as two people from the Sacred Legends community. And another old face who opened the door to the presentation room: Sebastion "Buddy" Fleer.

 

Old friends

Buddy, who worked for Ascaron/Studio II, and was already responsible for Sacred 2, is now a producer for DeepSilver. The other two people in the room are Alex Toplansky, Creative Producer, and Prachya "Isaac" Prakhen, Senior Creative Producer. All three are working on Sacred Citadel and Sacred 3. Parakhen was a Creative Producer on Sacred2 as well.

 

Then the presentation starts, Sacred Citadel is shown. Since it's the same version that could also be played in the entertainment area, and we have done so thorougly, it's nothing new. It seems to be a nice way of spending time, but nothing we haven't seen before.

After that, it gets interesting. The big screen changes to a PS3 menu. Toplansky, who leads the presentation, explaines to us that the PS3 is the lead plattform. The reasons for this decision are mainly the difficulty of programming for the Cell processor, and the (nowadays) lackluster hardware. This way, by having the hardest plattform to develop for as lead, a better quality can be assured for other plattforms. However, we still have to see how this decision will influence the PC version concerning graphics and controls. They promised us that they are still working on the PC controls.

 

Changes

While Toplansky is talking about the game, Parakhen and Buddy demonstrate it. The known characters for now are a mighty Safiri-Warrior, who also plays a pivotal role as a player character in Sacred Citadel, and the Ancarian Lancer. The camera is isometric, but at certain points of interest zooms in to highlight the background, or your next goal, etc. There seems to be no manual control as in Sacred 2, though.

Other things have changed, too. Ancaria is now home to many different cultures and races, such as the previously mentioned Safiri tribe. They are a conglomeration of pirates, seafarers, and merchants who revere the sun and gather their powers from it.

These different cultures lead to disputes between each other, but there is something to unite them: The Ashen Wars, lead by the Ashen empire against everybody else.

The world itself has changed in the 1000 years since Sacred 1/Underworld, too. According to Toplansky, there will still be recognisable places (such as the ruins of Braverock castle) that will be visited throughout the game.

In the course of the level, Buddy and Parakhen slay through hordes of groups of smaller enemies, smart fiends that try to use their shield strategically (being only able to be damaged from behind), and Grimmoc shamans that buff everything that is out to kill you. Each fight has its own little strategic value, and button mashing often isn't the best option.

These fights also go to show how much emphasis Sacred 3 puts on coop. While one player distracts the groups of enemies, the other may run around them and attack their (weaker protected) back side. The battle system, as far as we cam tell, is more direct than before. Position is important, parts of the world can be used as traps to hurt enemies or to hide from projectiles/push an enemy group back into a choke point to fight them one by one. It is heavy on lots of flashy action, which is not a bad thing.

The level design is nice to look at and constructed to boost the replay value. Each mission has multiple paths how it can be solved. These paths, according to Toplansky, don't only differ in which way you're going, but also in enemies and loot. Some paths are filled with small hordes of enemies, while others may lead to a big boss fight or a fun-to-watch blender trap.

 

Not all that glitters is Sacred

This already shows some very fundamental changes in what defines Sacred. There is no open world anymore. The "world" and the story are divided into small segments, which are completed in missions. The missions can be solved in different ways, but aside from this branching, the way is still somewhat straightforward.

Gone with the big, open world is also a noticable part of playing together; Only 4 people may be in the same game. Some missions require two or more players, and if you don't have enough friends, you will get AI companies to be able to still proceed. It is unknown if/how much you can control the AI, how many mission will require them, or how many AI companions you will get if you don't have a full game already.

 

Buddy and Parakhen continue slaying hordes of enemies. The lancer uses a spell to knock over the big grimmocs, after which the warrior unleashes a jump attack, landing with the blade of his mighty axe in the fallen grimmoc. All in all, it looks very satisfying.

The presentation already gives a good impression of Sacred 3's graphical capability. The animations are fluid, and the effects are nice to watch and fitting for a Hack'n'Slay. The level is designed with a special care for the fine details, and everything that can influence the battle has benn well designed.

It was not long before we reached the end of the presentation. Another indicator that the game will make time go by quite fast.

At the end of the mission, there is a breakdown of player success - most actions within the mission are rewarded with points, and each player can compare their achieved rank with that of their friends. Extra points are rewarded for coop actions.

Picked up loot can be evalueted, equipped or sold in the places called hubs, before/after every mission. It's not possible to do so while on a mission - the developers think that it would be too distracting from the essential, which is slaying lots of things with style. The same goes for Combat Arts - you cannot change them in missions, you can only pick two of your CAs beforehand. The reason for this strongly limited customization is, according to the producers, to keep the player from feeling overpowered.

 

Conclusion

Sacred 3 looks nice, seems to be enjoyable to play, and will bring many gamers joy. But the legacy of its predecessors is mostly ignored and can only be seen in bits and pieces here and there. Most things that made a Sacred a Sacred game have changed for Sacred 3. It is still a Hack'n'Slay, but it will not fit the expectations of old fans. Too heavy is the lack of an open world, the limited multiplayer, the mutilated character skill customization, etc.

 

Sacred 3 deserves a fair chance. But it will have a hard time convincing people that it is indeed a Sacred game, rather than just a random game with the name and the story slapped on.

 

It is still up in the air how the opinions about the game will change in the course of the future. There are still some big questions (sometimes intentionally) left open: How will character development work, which will be the other available characters, how will the MP work regarding open and/or closed net, and, of course: Will there be a playable Seraphim character?

 

Birne, thank for coming through on this, the clearest review that I think we've read about Sacred 2. You're saying it as it is, and most importantly, from someone who's a fan of the game, pointing out to all of us what's important to us, and what we're looking for...

 

Fewer Combat Arts allowed per segement of game, more attention to 'action" rather than the stats (groan) and this move away from an open world.

 

I think it's that last part that's making a lot of us here kind of blink in a little bit of surprise here? The open world of this franchise was probably one of the biggest draws, that and stacking stats, and playing with socketing... as a lot of other folks here have posted, this is a very strange (?) sort of departure/move from we knew as being the sacred franchise, but as we have posted for years, another big draw of this game was the immense amount of content that was in the game... open worlds are more expensive to run, easier to keep us in pre-determined paths? Is this current day economics having it's effect on beloved Ancaria?

 

The graphics are looking good, and I'm happy you're saying that the game runs in robust fashion. Some of the other previews are saying that team members from old Sacred game are a part of this new chapter... I'm going ot have to place my faith in them and hope that what is produced will still have a "Sacred" feel about it.

 

Thank Birne for this honest preview

 

:)

 

gogo

 

p.s. Which makes me think after I wrote the word preview.. since this game is pre-alpha... can lots of community feedback help with how this game's set up continues to be determined?

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p.s. Which makes me think after I wrote the word preview.. since this game is pre-alpha... can lots of community feedback help with how this game's set up continues to be determined?

Probably to some degree.

No matter the amount of community feedback, they probably can't suddenly change the game to open world. That would be a rather big undertaking for something that wasn't planned from the start. Other stuff like number of active skills, potential (lack of) focus on item stats and whatever else people might be interested in could potentially be changed very close to release (Look at Diablo 3 which for better or worse... had some really drastic changes up until a few months before release).

 

Which is why I have always thought that people should express their opinions when they don't like something. Many will say that there is no reason to complain, since the game is still far from release, and it is better to wait and see. But it is exactly because it is far away from release that it is the right time to complain. As it will be the only time where there is the slightest chance of affecting the developers (or more correctly, the publishers (=Deep Silver), if they can be made to believe there are more money to be made with design changes :D). Especially for Sacred 3 of all games, as the chances of post-release support in form of substantial patches are approximately 0% for a game released by Deep Silver.

 

Of course complaining =! whining, which people sometimes have issues differentiating between :) It has to be somewhat reasonable and well-articulated, otherwise it just ends up doing more harm than good, convincing the developers that their customers are whiny morons (which to be fair, a lot of game customers probably are...) who they should ignore.

 

But really, if people are unhappy about news, no matter how vague those news are, about Sacred 3, then go tell Deep Silver on their forums. It is unlikely to have much effect. However, not complaining is sure to have no effect.

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But really, if people are unhappy about news, no matter how vague those news are, about Sacred 3, then go tell Deep Silver on their forums. It is unlikely to have much effect. However, not complaining is sure to have no effect.

 

Sounds like a good Idea, we should all go flood the forums with our ideas/issues!

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Brine, thank you for such a well written post.

 

I can't help but think we are getting a game that has absolutely nothing to do with Sacred. Linear, Fixed Camera, 2CA's, mandatory 4p co-op, missions represent levels. Sorry it's simply not sounding very fun to me atm. The other day after reading something someone posted about S3 I couldn't help but think OH NOZ.... DS3 all over. Seems I am not the only one thinking that way.

 

I definitely will go to Deep's forums and post my feelings, one can only hope they make a difference.

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Well, at least the camera is oldschool :)

It's like it was with Sacred1 and I'm actually okay with that. Imho it helps keeping track of everything easier and to not lose focus on enemies or yoruself during action driven fights.

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Yes I guess I too can live with a fixed camera... tho I'd much rather look at what I want to look at. And I did become a fan playing Sacred 1 =)

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The reasons for this decision are mainly the difficulty of programming for the Cell processor, and the (nowadays) lackluster hardware. This way, by having the hardest plattform to develop for as lead, a better quality can be assured for other plattforms.

 

This is not even true, they said the same about Dark Souls and they have some bad framerate on the xbox 360 version, I also think the ps3 version what drop the quality on the xbox 360.

 

Also where are the videos for this game?

Edited by Nervusbreakdown

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divided into small segments
I still think it means its like Borderlands where the map is not one big world like sacred 2 but the same size just broken down into sections.

 

If this is the case I have OK with that.

 

JUST PLEASE don't do what DS3 did, Share the same screen in Coop, also no henchman in coop.

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divided into small segments
I still think it means its like Borderlands where the map is not one big world like sacred 2 but the same size just broken down into sections.

 

If this is the case I have OK with that.

It could be like that, but that's not really what I got from the previews.

 

also no henchman in coop.

It defaults to 3 henchmen in co-op, presumably with other players replacing them when you go online.

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It defaults to 3 henchmen in co-op, presumably with other players replacing them when you go online.

 

Cthulhu is suddenly reminded of Star Wars: The Old Republic.

 

 

Cthulhu doesn't foresee the need to be afraid of this; but it would be both a hindrance and (slight) amusement to see the AI starting fights with things that the player isn't currently interested in fighting (or doesn't want to fight).

 

Cthulhu seems to remember that being a problem in Sacred 2, actually...

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