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Food glorious food - What are you eating

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54 minutes ago, chattius said:

We have own old fish ponds nearby. So the only 'canned' fish we eat/use is anchovy paste from a tube. The main use is to give a fish taste to fishes like pikes which are quite neutral in taste. My grandgrandma was from Italy, so my grandma had some italian recipes. Garum was hard to get here so the anchovy paste was brought to her by a truck driver who was regulary in Italy. We still do some of the recipes,but main use is aroma to tasteless fish. Since we use it rarely a glass would be too much. If the tube is short before getting bad we use it for noodles

990107.jpg?20190818215336

 

 

mmm... plenty of Ummammi in that... maybe ill pick up a few tubes just to keep in my cupboard as a quick "flavor booster"

:devil:

 

gogo

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12 hours ago, gogoblender said:

mmm... plenty of Ummammi in that... maybe ill pick up a few tubes just to keep in my cupboard as a quick "flavor booster"

:devil:

 

gogo

I should have found this site earlier, how to use up anchovy paste in different recipes

https://www.cookinglight.com/food/recipe-finder/recipes-with-anchovy-paste?

 

I would add: flavour BUTTAH (Sardellenbutter , anchovy butter) with it, be it for smearing on bread or for using at BBQ or such.

250g butter, 6 toes of garlic through a garlic press, 3 finger brought stripe of anchovy paste, good mixed and stored cold in a fridge.

 

My brother uses this butter for BBQ's a lot. I am more a person who likes marinating and a flavoured butter makes it harder to find the right mix of spices then.

 

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Grünkern Wirsing Suppe

As a kid when at my grandparents it was an autumn/winter saturday lunch ritual. The big leaves from savoy cabbage where removed for sunday when roulades were eaten. The rest of Wirsing/cabbage (never throw food away) was made into a soup with Grünkern.

We will make it tomorrow when we plan to harvest not ripe spelt together with our 'summercamp kids' to produce our own Grünkern.

 

 

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On 7/24/2020 at 5:00 AM, chattius said:

Grünkern Wirsing Suppe

As a kid when at my grandparents it was an autumn/winter saturday lunch ritual. The big leaves from savoy cabbage where removed for sunday when roulades were eaten. The rest of Wirsing/cabbage (never throw food away) was made into a soup with Grünkern.

We will make it tomorrow when we plan to harvest not ripe spelt together with our 'summercamp kids' to produce our own Grünkern.

 

 

You know, have just realized that I dont think Ive even made my own soup ever :blink:  ... though I remember having to put up with my Dad's ritual Oxtail soup that we would flee from every sunday

:lol:

gogo

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On 7/25/2020 at 5:04 AM, Ysendra said:

COCO FISH

 

Hello! Quite a long time has passed since I last prepared a proper dish but today I made something we at home were pleased with I thought of sharing it with you guys too. It's simple and quick and also very Asian.


Our main ingredients would be fish and coconut milk. Locally, we call this dish "ginataang isda" which translates to fish cooked in coconut milk. "Isda" /is-da/ means fish and "gata" /guh-ta/ means coconut milk. Leafy greens are usually added as a secondary ingredient.

FISH. We opted to use "tilapia" -- mild-flavored freshwater fish, common in Philippine wet markets. You could also use mackerel, bullet tuna or red snapper.

COCO MILK. There are 2 types of coconut milk: regular coconut milk and coconut cream. When coconut meat is shredded and squeezed, the first few extractions would be thicker than the succeeding ones. This is the coconut cream or "kakang gata" as we call it. The rest would just be coconut milk or "gata". Either canned or fresh coconut milk is fine. You can also use coconut cream and thin it down with water.

VEGGIES. Mustard greens or "mustasa" /moos-ta-sa/ is the leafy green of choice but you can also use chinese cabbage or "pechay" /peh-chai/ of the 'bok-choy' cultivar. Chinese cabbage has 2 variants: napa cabbage which are oblongated heads with curled leaves and the bok-choy variant which grow in bunches of leaf blades reminiscent of celery.

 

spacer.png

 

INGREDIENTS

3 pcs tilapia, whole, scaled and gutted
2 red onions, medium sized, sliced
200g ginger, sliced into small strips
400ml coconut cream
4 bunches mustard greens or bok-choy chinese cabbage, stem tips removed and sliced into 3
1.5-2 tbsps fish sauce
1 cup water
ground black pepper
1 green chili finger or 2 pcs bird's eye chili (optional)
1 tbsp vinegar (optional)
3-4 pcs pandan or lemon grass leaves (optional)
steamed white rice, to serve

 

STEPS

1. Thaw the fish if frozen and wash. Score both sides and add a few pcs of ginger inside the cavity. 

2. Evenly scatter sliced onions and ginger in a heavy-bottomed pan and place the fish on top in a single layer. Aromatics are placed beneath to ensure that the fish don't stick to the pan. Add coconut cream, water, fish sauce and black pepper. You can use the can of the coco cream to measure the water.

OPTIONAL. Before you start simmering you can add chili (sliced as desired) or chili flakes and pandan or lemon grass leaves for flavor and fragrance. When using pandan or lemon grass, it's best to crease it to optimize flavor extraction. Roll them between your palms or bend them at different points. You can ask your hungry young ones to do this for you. Just make sure they wash their hands before they start 'playing' with it. Tie into a knot and add to the pan.

3. Simmer for 15-20 minutes or until fish is nearly cooked. Taste halfway through, adjust with fish sauce as needed and ladle some of the sauce on top of the fish.

OPTIONAL. When your pot starts to boil about 5 minutes in, you can add vinegar. Note that if you decide to add vinegar DO NOT STIR for 3-5 minutes. Vinegar imparts a tinge of acidity, helps reduce the fishiness and prolongs shelf-life. Its flavor, however, is aggressively sharp and "not stirring" offsets that by letting the heat mellow its "raw acids".

4. Add mustard greens or pechay and simmer for 5 minutes more or until the fish flakes when poked with a fork.

5. Serve with steamed white rice and enjoy!

 

Coconut milk easily spoils so pop leftovers in the fridge.

Here's a similar recipe with the mustard greens wrapped around the fish:
https://www.yummy.ph/recipe/mustasa-wrapped-tilapia-in-gata-recipe

You can also use shrimp if you prefer it over fish. Here's a recipe which skips the leafy greens and sautees the aromatics and the shrimp before adding the cream:
https://www.yummy.ph/recipe/ginataang-hipon-sauteed-shrimp-recipe

You sold me on coconut milk! :drool: though Im not so big a fan of fish, meaning that I dont usually eat it only because its perhaps something im not accustomed to preparing, I just adore the food profile or lemon grass, and coconut milk and will imibibe or eat almost anything prepared with those ingredients... bravo you for having this as part of your cook history..much better than my own of Mcdonalds fast food

:lol:

gogo

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Great you got the casings. Spicing with herbs is tricks I learned. People are so used to spices they grew up with.

 

For noodles we we have an old mechanical beast with a crank dating back to my grandgrandma from german speaking northern italy. It is still functional but works as a decoration because of its size in the entrance hall. We use it when we do noodles for many people with the field kitchen. Has its advantage and disadvantage. It's old and the matrices are from bronce not tevlon. Disadvantage its harder to clean than Tevlon, advantage it is harder to clean than tevlon...

Sounds strange but:

Nothing sticks to Tevlon so it is easy to clean.

Nothing sticks to Tevlon so the noodle surface is smooth.

But a smooth noodle surface makes sauce and pesto running down the noodles. A rough noodle surface makes the sauce stick to the noodle.

The funny thing is: they are still produced more or less the same as the one we have. Ours is attached to an chair used for milking cows made by my grandpa and painted with flowers by my grandma.

As they are sold nowadays, see the two steel screws?

torchio-per-bigoli-bigolaro-bottene_673_

 

To use them they have to be mounted with the screws on a desk, chair, ...

bigoli-all-anatra-41-1000.jpg

 

 

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On 7/27/2020 at 3:16 PM, Delta! said:

After I left my Job at the Hotel last year they had to pay me out quite an amount for all the extra days that I worked and public holidays. So I bought a Kenwood Professional Chef Stand mixer with a lot of attachments. Whisk, paddle beater, dough hook, folding tool, Blender, food processor with different blades, spice grinder, meat grinder(s) and sausage maker, scale. the only thing we needed was a pasta roller attachment. AND WE FINALLY GOT ONE!

 

We have been having so much fun making our own pasta. Start the pasta dough with the hook in the bowl, let it rest for 30 min while preparing sauces, meats, vegetables. Then roll out the pasta, and cook as desired. We have made lasagna, ravioli, dumplings and tagliatelle, and we flavour the dough with herbs and spices everytime. I even got some activated charcoal to make black pasta. 

 

Tonight we made tagliatelle, with a tomato sauce, made the mince ourselves.

We have also made our own sausages after we finally got our hands on some casings. My current job has a deli/shop, butchery and a bistro, so I asked the head butcher which casings he would recommend for starting out and trying our first time. It was a big success. First try we just used pork shoulder, added some duck fat, salt, pepper, herbs spices, a bit of breadcrumbs and an egg. it was great. Second time we went with chicken and pork mixed. more or less the same seasonings. It was delicious.:theuns::JC_gimmefive::woot:

 

Hope all of you are eating well?!?

Love this adventure! And so happy that you got a great pay out with your former employee  with culinary fixings to boot... good job Theuns! :dance: I've never actually made a single sausage or pasta, but everytime I read about people's endeavors here, I feel a small yearning... what a great skill that butchery is... though all this new equipment must take up some room? I'm a huge fan of Top Chef, and I've seen chefs proclaim that once they were taught how to create sausage they were addicted to the art

:)

 

gogo

ps I'm stoked now for dinner... feel like going out and buying... yes sausage! :lol:

 

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On 7/27/2020 at 4:51 PM, chattius said:

Great you got the casings. Spicing with herbs is tricks I learned. People are so used to spices they grew up with.

 

For noodles we we have an old mechanical beast with a crank dating back to my grandgrandma from german speaking northern italy. It is still functional but works as a decoration because of its size in the entrance hall. We use it when we do noodles for many people with the field kitchen. Has its advantage and disadvantage. It's old and the matrices are from bronce not tevlon. Disadvantage its harder to clean than Tevlon, advantage it is harder to clean than tevlon...

Sounds strange but:

Nothing sticks to Tevlon so it is easy to clean.

Nothing sticks to Tevlon so the noodle surface is smooth.

But a smooth noodle surface makes sauce and pesto running down the noodles. A rough noodle surface makes the sauce stick to the noodle.

The funny thing is: they are still produced more or less the same as the one we have. Ours is attached to an chair used for milking cows made by my grandpa and painted with flowers by my grandma.

As they are sold nowadays, see the two steel screws?

torchio-per-bigoli-bigolaro-bottene_673_

 

To use them they have to be mounted with the screws on a desk, chair, ...

bigoli-all-anatra-41-1000.jpg

 

 

Just a quick comment re the Teflon... what a wonder!  In fact lately I've seen a number of chefs that say to just keep buying new ones when the coating wears out because its so short-lasting

:blink:

gogo

 

 

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On 7/26/2020 at 10:51 PM, gogoblender said:

You sold me on coconut milk! :drool: though Im not so big a fan of fish, meaning that I dont usually eat it only because its perhaps something im not accustomed to preparing, I just adore the food profile or lemon grass, and coconut milk and will imibibe or eat almost anything prepared with those ingredients... bravo you for having this as part of your cook history..much better than my own of Mcdonalds fast food

:lol:

gogo

Thanks! Those ingredients are abundant here in the Philippines and its use in different dishes is common in South East Asia. I'm far from becoming an established home cook but it's something I'm very interested in learning more about. If I need tips I can always ask my mom and my grandma anyway. It's understandable if you are not accustomed to fish. Preparing seafood takes time and it's, well, fishy Lol. We in the family though have grown to love fish because my dad will choose it over chicken, pork or beef any day.

There are other dishes for coconut milk aside from fish. I can think of beef, chicken, pork, squash and although not exactly fish but still seafood, shrimp, crabs and noodles usu with cockles.

  • "Rendang" - Indonesian beef stew. IIRC there are like pastes? which you could use to marinate the beef in overnight before cooking it in coco milk. My dad cooked it for us last year.
  • "Bicol Express" - Bicol, a province here in the Philippines, is known for the natives' spicy dishes and also because of Mount Mayon, a volcano known for its perfect cone shape. Bicol express is a dish made of pork slices boiled in coconut milk/cream. Some even prepare it by actually boiling long enough to reduce the sauce until coconut oils begin to separate from the cream. Then there's the loads of chili added and we know that oils are the perfect medium for the spicy sensation. Makes it even more of a gastronomic experience.
  • Chicken - There's chicken in plain coconut milk and also chicken curry.
  • Crabs & Squash -  Cooking crab in coco milk is something similar to that of fish but without ginger and instead of leafy greens, squash and string beans are added. Without the crab, squash in coco milk is still considered a 'complete' dish or for some at least a side dish.
  • "Laksa" - Malaysian coconut curry soup. You got noodles in it and small shrimp. Some add cockles as well. It's also popular in Singapore too ... and the aroma. Goodness it's very distinct and appetizing! My brain can smell it as I write this. I dare say there are some instant noodles which imitate that smell.

There are many more these are just what first came to mind.

Speaking of McDonalds, the world is in a crisis right now and 2020 is officially cancelled :cry: so, in my opinion, now is actually the best time to buy takeout. I think buying food from local business should also be promoted.

 

On 7/26/2020 at 11:40 PM, chattius said:

Cooked/boiled fish...

very rarely done here. If then it is a dry variant of fish where more fat is needed for taste

Local would be buttermilk, cream, juniper berries (whole for taste), sea buckthorn berries (historical to add fruit acid, now most use citron),..

The buttermilk bacteria and the berry acid also soften the fish and it is more easily digested

 

I planted some sea buckthorn just above our house. The house is build into a hill and the bushes stop erosion and prevent mud slides at cloudbursts. Sea buckthorn berries are nice for jelly, fruit wine, some recipes or just eaten as a vitamine bomb. It's juice is used when having a rough throat, we had no hot citron juice.

I've tried canned fish from Germany and I wasn't very pleased. It had "Heringsfilet" on the front but after googling I guess lots of brands do. One was in tomato and the other was yellow like mustard. Maybe I'd like the dry variants better. And I would have a cup of citrusy tea even if I'm not sick, We have a calamansi tree growing in our backyard and a single squeeze makes a cup of tea even more soothing. They're small fruits about an inch or an inch and a half in diameter, like a very small lime and are way too sour. Aside from tea, we use it for pancit (Filipino version of Chinese oil noodles) and some other dishes.

 

On 7/28/2020 at 3:16 AM, Delta! said:

After I left my Job at the Hotel last year they had to pay me out quite an amount for all the extra days that I worked and public holidays. So I bought a Kenwood Professional Chef Stand mixer with a lot of attachments. Whisk, paddle beater, dough hook, folding tool, Blender, food processor with different blades, spice grinder, meat grinder(s) and sausage maker, scale. the only thing we needed was a pasta roller attachment. AND WE FINALLY GOT ONE!

 

We have been having so much fun making our own pasta. Start the pasta dough with the hook in the bowl, let it rest for 30 min while preparing sauces, meats, vegetables. Then roll out the pasta, and cook as desired. We have made lasagna, ravioli, dumplings and tagliatelle, and we flavour the dough with herbs and spices everytime. I even got some activated charcoal to make black pasta. 

 

Tonight we made tagliatelle, with a tomato sauce, made the mince ourselves.

I've tried making pasta once and it was so much fun! Although the pulling of the flattened dough needed a really long table. It was a great experience even for a beginner. I'm glad knowing you've had a great investment.

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56 minutes ago, gogoblender said:

To use them they have to be mounted with the screws on a desk, chair, ...

bigoli-all-anatra-41-1000.jpg

I'm sorry I can't help but notice her shoes. I love that she's such a lady boss with that crank making pasta in style  Much respect.

50 minutes ago, gogoblender said:

Just a quick comment re the Teflon... what a wonder!  In fact lately I've seen a number of chefs that say to just keep buying new ones when the coating wears out because its so short-lasting

:blink:

gogo

I'm also curious abt this. I'm not sure if Teflon is still the way to go nowadays. I've heard some are using diamond coated pans or whatever that would be. Or maybe it's just that it's the only thing I hear on TV shopping channels?

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1 hour ago, Ysendra said:

 

I'm sorry I can't help but notice her shoes. I love that she's such a lady boss with that crank making pasta in style  Much respect.

I'm also curious abt this. I'm not sure if Teflon is still the way to go nowadays. I've heard some are using diamond coated pans or whatever that would be. Or maybe it's just that it's the only thing I hear on TV shopping channels?

The shoes... As I wrote our noodle machine is mounted on a chair used for milking cow and has flowers painted on it. The picture is from a page which sells noodle machines nearly identical to the century old my grandgrandma brought with her.

It's an Italian company which sells the noodle machine and I bet the shoes are italian design. My wife prefers form follows function. She has to stand and walk a lot as a doc, she prefers Birkenstock shoes.

1 hour ago, Ysendra said:

I've tried canned fish from Germany and I wasn't very pleased. It had "Heringsfilet" on the front but after googling I guess lots of brands do. One was in tomato and the other was yellow like mustard. Maybe I'd like the dry variants better. And I would have a cup of citrusy tea even if I'm not sick, We have a calamansi tree growing in our backyard and a single squeeze makes a cup of tea even more soothing. They're small fruits about an inch or an inch and a half in diameter, like a very small lime and are way too sour. Aside from tea, we use it for pancit (Filipino version of Chinese oil noodles) and some other dishes.

There are several ways for buying Heringsfilet: in tins (can be stored nearly endlessly), in plastic boxes with cream and vegs, fresh, in barrels, as Salzheringe are salted ones, Bratheringe are smoked, Matjes are young soused herings and my favourite

This site says how Matjes are fished, prepared and some recipes

https://www.junedarville.com/dutch-new-herring.html

My neighbour is from the Netherlands and he brings Matjes in barrels for me. At firefighters everyone gets it share. Some eat a matjas in a breadroll with some onions (Matjesbrötchen, some places they are sold by small stands in the street). I prefer to make a salade fro, them and add potato with skin.

1-Start_Holland_Matjes_Juni_2018_070-766

 

 

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1 hour ago, Ysendra said:

I'm also curious abt this. I'm not sure if Teflon is still the way to go nowadays. I've heard some are using diamond coated pans or whatever that would be. Or maybe it's just that it's the only thing I hear on TV shopping channels?

I think that Tevlon , Diamonds and all this to reduce the oil by a tiny amount is not needed if you spend one time in your life 100-200 Euro for a real good cast iron pan. Just make sure that the pan is concave when cold. So when heating it gets plan. Of cause cast iron is tricky and has to be learned, but heh, you have a lifetime to learn it ;)

pfanne-heiss_pfanne-kalt_rothpfannen-360

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On 7/30/2020 at 3:43 AM, chattius said:

Quiche Lorraine, the barbaric way

Most villages here had a public baking house. Heating it was hard work and so the people doing it got a good meal with lot of meat and vegs from the village community. After bread baking the leftover bread dough from rye was used to make tray-baked cakes topped with fine cut leftovers from the meat, bacon, vegs, eggs, .... The temperature of the cooling down baking house was no longer hot enough for baking bread but enough for a Speckkuchen (translate bacon quiche) eaten by the persons who had to do fire control and cleaning the oven.

Still doing it when we have a baking day, like this weekend.

Quiche Lorraine lacks the randomness in my opinion. I prefer our variants. And I prefer the bread dough over the nowadays shortcrust pastry for quiche lorraine

State TV often shows old recipes. Page and picture are from their german page.

https://www.hr-fernsehen.de/sendungen-a-z/hessen-a-la-carte/sendungen/ofenkuchen-aus-dem-backhaus,sendung-73786.html

lauchkuchen-100~_t-1570030596844_v-16to9

I love this writeup Chattius ... Its so relaxing to read food writeups like this and Theuns about the pasta making and Androdion with his expert fish recipes

,,, who would have remembered the ambient temperature from the baking house would be so important ... good read

:pitcher:

gogo

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On 7/29/2020 at 10:03 PM, chattius said:

My neighbour is from the Netherlands and he brings Matjes in barrels for me. At firefighters everyone gets it share. Some eat a matjas in a breadroll with some onions (Matjesbrötchen, some places they are sold by small stands in the street). I prefer to make a salade fro, them and add potato with skin.

1-Start_Holland_Matjes_Juni_2018_070-766

 

On 7/30/2020 at 3:43 PM, chattius said:

Quiche Lorraine, the barbaric way

Most villages here had a public baking house. Heating it was hard work and so the people doing it got a good meal with lot of meat and vegs from the village community. After bread baking the leftover bread dough from rye was used to make tray-baked cakes topped with fine cut leftovers from the meat, bacon, vegs, eggs, .... The temperature of the cooling down baking house was no longer hot enough for baking bread but enough for a Speckkuchen (translate bacon quiche) eaten by the persons who had to do fire control and cleaning the oven.

Still doing it when we have a baking day, like this weekend.

This is the best thing I like about cooking and food. It shows a lot about a region's culture and it's part of almost every celebration even if it's just the companionship of friends, family or neighbors. Plus these recipes all look fresh! I'm also surprised of the barrel above. Here I thought barrels today are exclusively used for wines. Nice knowing that they're still in trend in other parts of the world :)

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On 7/31/2020 at 2:10 AM, gogoblender said:

,,, who would have remembered the ambient temperature from the baking house would be so important ... good read

:pitcher:

gogo

Wasn#t in forum yesterday because we had our baking day.

Temperature is important and used for different things:

1st: Flammkuchen. They are the first to put into the oven to test if the heat is enough for bread and if there are hotspots because the heat is not yet evenly distributed in the oven. They are done in less than 2 minutes.

2nd: Bread

3rd: Blechkuchen: at the cooling down oven cakes from yeast dough baked in sheet pans (Blech)

4th: Speckkuchen (close to quiche lorraine, but from rests of rye bread dough, meat, leek, eggs,...), traditional last for the people who do clean up and night watch to prevent fires when wind is blowing into the hot ash

 

Flammkuchen was imported by the french as tarte flambee. But it lost some of its barbarian charm making its way into french cuisine. My mom is from Wetzlar. Wetzlar is mid in the German Handkäse area. So we often had Flammkuchen layed with leftover stuff from breakfeast at the baking house: Handkäse and Blutwurst (sort of blood sausage). Blutwurst is a sausage with relative low fat, Handkäse is a soft cheese with nearly no fat. So there was some fat needed for taste and preventing burning. This was done at my place with Schmand. Schmand was also needed for Schmandkuchen as in 3rd.

Flammkuchen with bloodsausage and Handkäse

flammkuchen-mit-handkaese-und-blutwurst.

Schmandkuchen, an easy one for kids to train baking: yeast dough, a layer Schmand, some sugar on top. The sugar will be caramalized by the heat from the baking house oven

hessischer-schmandkuchen.jpg

The more advanced Schmandkuchen would be close to cheese cakes. The next level, still not top of the barbarian Schmandkuchen tradition would be; Faule Weiber Kuchen. It translates as lazy women cake ;) 

An quick and easy cake done by the farmers wife who was too tired (not lazy) to do something complicated after all the farm work. The name came rom town people who would have the time to do complicated cakes.

Just a Mürbeteig (shortcrust pastry), Schmand and some fruits, nowadays mainly mandarines (all what was alltime present on a farm, except the nowdays mandarines)

faule-weiber-kuchen.jpg

A bit more complicated (and probably already close to a cheese cake) is to make the layer from Quark, Schmand, eggs, oil, pudding powder and fruits. But it takes me just 4 minutes and I'm man who is not able for multitasking;)

Can be done at sudden guests, or guests who stay longer than planed

Watch the video how fast it is done, even without a machine

 

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First time I deep fried...and only because my Aunt and Uncle made fresh from scratch Sri Lankan Rolls... real and verily... *pour two inches of oil into a pan' ...  :eek:  have NEVER used that much oil in anything before... but found a small sauce pan and got the oil up to about an inch and a bit and dropped these delicious tasties inside... Dang home made is good!

IMG_4166.jpgIMG_4164.jpg

 

:dance:

gogo

IMG_4158.jpg

IMG_4156.jpg

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This sort of recipes are the reason we have two quick attach folded 'fire-blankets' in our kitchen. It are two because I am paranoid. And I became more and more paranoid the more kids we had. My paranoia was that I may need one for the burning pan and one for a burning cook. :theuns:

I bought them for 300Euro, 50 pieces so a LOT cheaper per piece. Mom, siblings, parents in law, each car, ....

They can be easily removed from the wall and taken to a BBQ place, campfire, ...

1024px-247_Home_Rescue_fire_blanket.jpg

 

For the oil -Big Don might be angry- I prefer sunflower oil from Russia which I can buy really cheap at a russian food store 10 miles away. There was a mutation (not gene engineering) in russian sunflowers increasing the amount of oil in the fruit by a big amount. The advantage is that the unrefined oil from these sunflowers has a smokepoint which is as high as from refined normal ones. Best of both worlds.

I don't know exactly what is written on the bottles :chattius: (didn#t know that I had my own emoji

But this is the text on their homepage, and a friend said it is about the bottle below.

Quote

Basic advantages:

high content of oleic acid (more than 75%)

natural antioxidant

high content of vitamin E

as concerns useful properties is equivalent to olive oil

smoke point = 260 degrees (while the usual sunflower oil is 170 degrees)

increased oxidation stability (does not form carcinogens)

Their homepage:

http://www.aston.ru/en/products/food/rastitelnye-masla/butilirovannoe-maslo/aston/vysokooleinovoe-podsolnechnoe/

1637247.jpeg

 

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