Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
munk

What happened to the RPG while I became an old man?

Recommended Posts

I go back to the Atari 5200. I was old then- 30- most people that age would not get themselves an game system. But I was a reader, SF, classics, loved movies, comics, pop art forms, and always music. What was wrong with fun? Nothing.

Doom came and went, Hexen, Heretic, Diablo, others...then Sacred. Sacred really did it; I thought Diablo was great, but Sacred was a place you could go back to, live in. And we did- my son grew up with Sacred. (He started on Doom when the media was filled with dire warnings about children and gore and what would happen to them. My son is one of the most moral and honest persons you will meet. The secret was parenting, not gaming. Leave a kid alone with Doom and no parent around at all and maybe the child will take instruction from the screen....)

When Elder Scrolls reached Morrowind, it was a milestone for everybody, but when they reached Oblivion, it was a high water mark. Why? AI, Open World, Character build variations, and great stories and adventures.

The Holy Grail, to me, in gaming was AI. Did the game react to the player? Did NPC's react to the player's actions, have memory of those actions, and how independently could they respond?

There were games at the top of the heap that had a wide variation in character building, and choices to make with tools and spells and abilities. Attributes and Skills choice, and how that affected game play. Sacred 1 and 2 both have a level of character building not seen in games today.

RPG's were coming into their own. Remember Two Worlds? Gothic? Now look at where we are just a few years later.

 

AI is gone. For real time reaction to player we have multi-player games; you react to your peers. In single player RPG we have ruins and caves to explore. When the last dark hole has been found, there isn't much reason to go back and do it again. Character building is deciding which sword you'll swing, to bow or not to bow, heavy or light armor and how cute your girl or guy looks in that outfit. Skyrim dropped attributes to three, and spellmaking is now cookie cutter with far fewer choices, and you cannot make your own. You cannot make your own enchantments/spells on equipment either; you choose from a very simple menu of pre-assigned values depending upon your skill level. It's not about 'what kind?" of affect so much as it is, 'how much?" The AI in Oblivion, once proudly held as a pinnacle, was quietly dropped and initially few even realized was gone. Skyrim looked the same- no- much better- those potato heads were gone, so it must be better, right?

At this stage in our technology, you can pretty much say every new game in a series has the opportunity to look better than the one before. That's graphics, pixels, definition; not gameplay.

First person shooters seem to dominate what young people want. Those haven't changed much, they look better, feel more responsive with superb graphics, and the online multi experience has swelled with participation. But what has happened to my beloved RPG?

In Oblivion an NPC could be made to love or hate you, and would remember, has shared history. In Oblivion when you saved the world shopkeepers and passer-bys thank you. In Skyrim NPC's dont realize their 'wife' has expired, her body lying twenty feet away, let alone you saving the world. Mages dont know you're head of the college. You are alone in a vast world. When you finish with that empy world, you are done. The Big Empty. Stranger in a Strange land.

 

This isn't a debatable point. Bethesda dropped AI and thought minispeeches by NPC's would mimic enough to pass inspection. Having Guards in Skyrim know you're the Listener for the Dark Brotherhood is an appalling breach, a sloppy replacement for AI, for the lack of true feedback or response. A shopkeeper that follows you into your home, repeating for the 20th time the same speech he always blathers is not AI or communication. It's a bore. It's tedious. And you can't make him stop! You don't have conversations in Skyrim; you listen to their inane scripts over and over. The only choices in interaction are the few scripted conversations with NPC's in major quests where you sometimes have option 'A" or "B", and these are few in the body of play. This is Fallout format. This is Red Dead Redemption format. This is surrender. Bethesda doesn't even bother to write much script for major companions. AI is hard, writing possible script choice is hard. Graphics are easy by comparison, and if there are enough places to go, who will miss these things?

Character building is still there, but much simplified, and with pre-canned outcomes. Choice is losing the battle in modern RPG's. Why?

I've tried the Draconis stuff, Risen, Witcher; if anyone knows of a great RPG please tell me. Reckoning was pretty good- not much choice- but good- having promise of future improvement, the add-on was fantastic, but that franchise died.

Oblivion was far from perfect. Good minds can debate how to handle the leveling problem of opponents in the game and assets like legendary blades, and NPC conversations were often trite, but it had AI, wide character and attribute combination build possibilities and interaction with game world. The game had constant variation. NPC's thought for themselves. The game unfolded differently each time it was played because of this. Sure, AI was simple, but they tried, and it worked. Now no one does. It's in the ashcan of history.

Modern games have dropped Good and Evil; it's all moral relativism now. In previous Elder Scrolls you could redeme yourself if black- evil- in Skyrim no one knows or cares you murdered Lydia. There are no consequences for your actions because there is no scripting for NPC's other than basic. They don't know if you are of good karma or bad. Saving the world or telling your companion to touch that daedric pillar for their sacrafise to a dark god are equally ignored. You can't even get the Xbox achievement unless you complete all the evil acts in the Daedric questline. I'm not a Priest, don't attend church or have an axe to grind, but making all possible actions in an RPG equal mirrors the same moral relativism the Western World currently flirts with.

I believe a game can provide an opportunity to role play- you are not going to become a thief because you play one on Skyrim. But I also believe having no in- game, and now little industry- wide division between morality and immorality is dangerous. They are not the same- that is why they are role played. Yes, games are political. They do intentionally attempt to shape public opinion. I guess that's human, but acceptance of differing choices in personal and family life is one thing, accepting no difference between murder and self sacrifice is clumsily done and destructive. I don't really need video games to shape my political decisions, but it seems politics have crept into everything. That too, can be seen as a restriction of choice formerlly left to the owner player.

The folks here who researched the math behind the spells and actions inside Sacred could have hammered this topic out of the ballpark in far fewer words. I'm not a research guy. Hope some of what I've said rings a bell, and hasn't done to you what that liitle girl in Whiterun Skyrim does to me,

"I'm not afraid of you, I'll fight anyone, elders, kids, ...." Whatever RPG makers decide we can still do in the future, I hope they return the ability to close the door on that little girl. Character build variations, attributes, action and spell making, interaction with NPC's and AI are all diminshed, but at the least bring back the 'A' button and halt that conversation!

I'm hoping the new wave of community- start games, like Grim Dawn and hopfully Unbended, will push aside the complacency of the big boys. That's how capitalism works, you know, when there's a need, someone finds a way and if it's wanted enough it's successful. I'm hoping gifted persons on computers will still build games that'll break through. The movie, Night Of The Living Dead, started as a small project by a teacher with amatuers; now it's the forefather of an entire genre. It can happen. It must happen if I'm going to be playing any new game in the next ten years, or if I'll simply be using antiquated equipment with inferior graphics to play games that are superior in every other way to what is being done.

Why are they killing choice?

  • Like! 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is only one thing I can tell you, Munk, besides the fact that it was an awesome piece of gamer's rant. The lack of choice is now a general gaming tendency. It happens not only with RPGs, but with other games as well. You think that FPS haven't changed much - and the first thing that comes to my mind is that picture I found on one gaming forum some time ago:

2ivcg29.gif

They also became very short, but that's another general tendency. I guess that games that can be played for a long time are considered not profitable, because if you have a game you can play you won't be buying more. But now you also think twice before buying many games - Are the four hours of gameplay really worth the price?

 

In RPGs the lack of choice and customization is felt better than in other games, because these things were a staple of the genre. Action RPGs like Sacred never were much about choice of actions and plot advancement, which is why they require more choice and variety in character development to be interesting. And that is where many new games of the genre are lacking. Even though I'm a big ARPG fan, the only project I'm currently looking forward to is Grim Dawn - it might not have a huge world to explore, but it offers a very good variety of character builds and playstyles to try out. And even Grim Dawn is developed independently of big publishers, nobody wanted to fund the game despite Titan Quest being an acclaimed success.

 

The lack of good AI is also omnipresent. With Internet technology advancement, multiplayer games are becoming more and more popular. As a consequence, many developers consider singleplayer campaigns only as an addition to multiplayer engine, and AI only as a means of training before facing human opponents. They are partially right - it is impossible to create an AI that would be as good as a human, so it would never offer the same challenge. But looking at many of the older games, it is possible to notice that PvE and PvP can both be challenging, just in different ways. In Sacred 2, PvE and PvP builds are usually very different, because single human players and AI mobs and bosses offer different kind of playstyle. And then there are people who just don't like playing against other people - if the current tendency continues, they would have very few games to play.

 

Now it looks like the game development branched into big publishers who do modern graphics and physics and indie devs who make interesting or at least somewhat original game design and mechanics. Why is that we can't have the top-notch looks and interesting gameplay at the same time, probably no one knows.

  • Like! 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Silver_Fox, you put a lot of ideas foreward for me to think about. Thank God! Wish I could get a transfusion of information and analogue from all you knowledgable people. There are many games I don't know-and the tech side my son understands while I do not.

AI may never be 'good as a human' at this stage of our tech, but it won't be that way forever. More importantly, AI remains the most desired achievement. Gaming is supposed to feel real? They can't get away with better graphics each year as a replacement for interaction, er, can they? I don't think so. The wild card has to be the small children playing now, having grown up with toys I only dreamed of while watching Startrek, (the one with Capt Kirk) Human beings are smarter than the business is giving them credit for, and those children are maturing and will want more than better, 'splat' effects when their hero kills a bad guy.

You could look at the sideshows the industry has given us as a diversion- the unspoken thing in the room, the beast everyone is afraid to mention, is still AI, and the diversions won't change that. Isn't it intrinsic to the art form? I think it is. If they do not push that, then games will never be much more than improved Asteroids. Hollow. Todd Howard said another thing I remembered, for reasons other than he would hope. He's said that the spell making in Skyrim, for instance, had to go because of the graphics- he said reluctantly. He has his priorities wrong. The features he chopped off should never be sacrafised for better visuals. It's the other way around. Apparently, high definition is a over-valued goal, and they are not thinking of the game as a whole. I get that they developed while the industry had lower tech and clumsy graphics, and have always wanted the visuals to be superb. Didn't we all want that? But that's not the end goal.

Someone could take what the tech could bear today and with equal or better than Oblivion level graphics push AI beyond what it has ever been- and have character building and attributes and all else.

I'm subscribed to Grim Dawn, if that's the right word, and while I like it, glad it's here, support the direction, it is not really a Sacred game. It's a step in the right direction.

 

You said Sacred used Character development because it didn't have as much choice in action and plot advancement. And that's exactly why Sacred is re-playable. But repeatable games don't take a bite out of sales-that's apples and oranges, a different market. I don't believe for a second that Sacred or Oblivion took sales from the hordes of buyers who would purchase another 8 hours of Halo, with their always new release coming next year. That 'event' in the marketplace will always exist- it's like the pop music market for young teens.

I don't know what Pve and PvP are. You know, I watched Television in the 60's and much of that programing is contrived and lighweight by today's standards. We wanted more, but the networks were afraid. All the issues they were afraid of then have been hammered out over and over today, with more realistic, filled-out relationships. These things do change. I see the programing today has it's own set of pitfalls and stereotypes too. I just hope this doesn't mean I'll have to wait for my children's generation to mature to see great games. I hope it's not that long. It was disturbing to see so many elder scrolls fans not notice or not care about the huge cuts in character building and choice. But that just leaves a big window open for another company to put out a product that does.

I guess ranting is one of the things I do best. Too bad I never made any money at it.

 

Oh-the opposing maps of the two fps says it all. I didn't actually know that. They have shortened everything, haven't they? I wonder how much of that is the devalued US dollar?

Edited by munk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sigh... Yeah...

 

Sadly, the gaming industry is still an industry. And while it started with good old “ma and pa” shops, the bigwigs came along with their supermarkets and pushed quality service out for cheap quantity. And now the market is oversaturated with cheap knockoffs, in many cases forgetting that RP in RPG stands for RolePlaying. As in “I don’t want to ride on the shoulder of some guy you created, I want to BE that guy”. Medieval Fantasy games are not all RPGs.

 

On the other hand, we always have cheap knockoffs and quick cashins for everything. How many Twilight and Harry Potter knockoffs are out there? But it’s the best of those that stand the test of time, and we remember them and support them. So just DON’T BUY / SUPPORT that crap and in 10 years it will disappear into entropy. Remember the 60s, 70s, 80s, 90s crap? Yes, but only the BEST of crap, for it was an epic fail to remember.

 

Now onto AI. I LOVE AI in games so much, I went into automation industry believing to be destined to making the worlds best AIs for robots. I always overanalyze AI in every game I play, because it’s my passion and research.

 

So let me tell you about my favorite videogame ever, which I only got to play in 2007 - Dungeon Keeper 2. It is, what I would call, the pinnacle of greatest AI ever. Your small army had characteristics, personalities, interacted with the world objects on day-to-day basis, and most importantly had a self-preservation instinct. And the world was full 3D, on a 2D minecraft chess board... You could easily redo the game engine almost into any other gaming genera. All this was all accomplished in 1999.

 

Nowadays, when I see an enemy get snagged on a wall, get caught up in an infinite animation loop or plain out suicide rush you, I remember the Dungeon Keeper 2 AI. When your multyDVD game fails in comparison to a 15 year old AI on 1 old CD, you really failed.

 

I still believe, if you can harness THAT AI, you could copy-paste into a real robot. And have been slowly reverseengineering it as a hobby since 2008

mydk3s.png

 

Haven’t played Skyrim yet, but I was not too happy with the older game series AIs ether. Still remember Morrowind, and Aldam Berendus chasing me from Raven Rock up to Thormoor Gray-Wave just for coming out of my home and being a werewolf. The AI was never perfect in these games, but it was good enough and fun. Don’t miss the Cyrodiil guard popping out of the woodwork the moment I did 1 gold in damages... Or that statue of in Bruma.

 

Now on to rhetorical Q&A

Oh-the opposing maps of the two fps says it all. I didn't actually know that. They have shortened everything, haven't they? I wonder how much of that is the devalued US dollar?

For your FPS questions, try Rogue Warrior. You don’t have to finish it. Even watching a lets play video will do. When you had enough, look at videofutage and screenshots from other FPS games, and fail to see any difference or a good game worth playing. THAT'S how bad it is.

 

As for the bigwig games tasting like bile, its the "marketing and engineering" issue. You can read up on it here, but I will give you the short paragraph:

Let's say, as a hypothetical, we were tasked with improving the country's rail system. If left to their own devices, engineering would come up with some form of hovering magnetic rail system that would get you to your destination with blinding speed and absolute safety ... and only cost double the GNP of Ireland. Marketing would suggest repainting the existing trains and simply advertising that cars kill people.

And the marketing knows that there will always be a big demographic of kids as "That's what I like about these high school girls, man; I get older, they stay the same age". These kids grow up, the next batch is right there to replace them, just as young, just as gullible and just as dumb. "Why support the old fans? New fans are easier to milk for money."

 

As for the:

Now it looks like the game development branched into big publishers who do modern graphics and physics and indie devs who make interesting or at least somewhat original game design and mechanics. Why is that we can't have the top-notch looks and interesting gameplay at the same time, probably no one knows.

TOO EXPENSIVE. It takes a day to make 2-3 models from scratch at best. It takes a week to fix a programming problem for just 10 square meters of the map. And all the people involved have to get payed... This is why BioShock Infinite went under.

We need to develop a multyplatform universal FREE easy to learn game engine for that to happen, and that is titanic work.


P.S. Boy is this a great text wall to read.

P.S.S. And don’t talk to me about "Dungeon Keeper mobile". That’s not a game, it’s a sticker on a turd.

  • Like! 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aaaahhhhhh!! I loved Dungeon Keeper and still play them both sometimes. I remember the very first time I played the original and heard the description, "Smilesville!" Even now just remembering that name makes me smile and I suddenly want to play it again. What does it say about modern games that just seeing the name "Dungeon Keeper" makes me want to drop the new games I am trying and go back to play a game made in 1997 instead? Damn but those were some really great games!

Edited by podgie_bear
  • Like! 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

these posts are what I came for, why I wanted to ask. thanks all.

 

Oh, just an aside about Morrowind- it did not have the AI of Oblivion. I forget what Beth called that AI in Oblivion, but it's gone. They returned to the Morrowind model in Skyrim, but without Morrowind's layers of factions and that societal context they had going. They never returned to Morrowind's level of 'book' literacy.

There's a surface layer of 'grit' and 'harder hitting' realism in Skyrim's writing that is at first glance superior to Oblivion's simpler approach, but it is only skin deep. There isn't really anything there, and it lacks the suggestive beauty of Morrowind, where you really felt you were picking paths between factions in a strange land. Its all just soup in Skyrim, nearly word salad. They faked it. But that was enough for most players..

As an ecomomic target, 'kiddies' will always be a powerful one. But it is not the only one, and the market just keeps growing and widening. There are more adults on the planet than kids. Those adults want games that are playable. This is not 1965 or even 1985, adults spend bucks on entertainment, and movies are on the decline. It's the lego bloks model. Adults who grew up on Legos do not build legos at age 30, usually, but the toys they do use are much more expensive. That could and does include video games.

If I've learned anything from this thead, it's that as soon as these engines are cheaper to get, there may be better games. Lego can't get much of the adult market, but someone is going to, because it is there and largely untapped.

I could have said the whole thing by using 'toy's; the cheap games are toys, and adults want better.

 

...I love the idea of a free engine. to my mind, that is .....a gift, spiritual, God inspired, freeing...its, well, a person who participated in that project would be like....Gutenberg, mechancial printing press. I looked it up. If there are people who think like that in this world right now, we aren't licked at all. SX255, thanks for posting that.

Edited by munk
  • Like! 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RPG's did change.

Sacred is actualy one of the many RPG's which does not carry the original spirit of RPG's. Does not make it a bad game, I love Sacred. But still it's not a deep RPG.

The first computer RPG's was been made to emulate the experience of the pen&paper RPG on a computer and date back to the mainframes even befor there was been home computers.

This spirit of trying to get as close as possible to a real pen&paper RPG was been carried on and hit it's peek at the mid 90s. The 90s was the golden era of computer RPG's. Finaly computers was been powerfull enough to make big worlds with rich storys and high details possible.

After the 90s it wend slowly down hill, concerning the original pen&paper spirit. We still see games carrieng that spirit on. But the majority is focusing on other aspects. More action oriented, more mechanical game play instead of immersion, etc.

Edited by Thorium
  • Like! 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are still many games out there that can give you a good rpg fix.

Occasionally one gets released that just grabs you and doesn't let go.

For me that's Might&Magic X: Legacy.

Great old school rpg fun. But canned by most critics and so probably wont sell well.

This is the problem.

A lot of people that review games these days are used to the current rpg's. They simply have no idea how earlier rpg's focused more on story and character development rather than graphics.

And poor reviews mean less games sold so less developers are willing to chance making a rpg game that takes a few years to develop (good rpg's require a longer development period) that may well get canned by reviews.

And being satisfied with playing older games means my old pc will still do me for another few years yet.

 

end note: The fact that Larian Studios can release an excellent rpg, that being Divinity:Original Sin, and apparently making a profit from it, gives me hope that the pc rpg genre is still truly alive and kicking. ;)

  • Like! 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not just CRPG. Also good old pen and paper. Our old university play group did a 25 year celebration: the men hating amazon was married with 3 kids, the agile halfling thief was 341 pounds, the old massive dragon steak eating barbarian was thin as a pencil and vegan, ....

  • Like! 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not just CRPG. Also good old pen and paper. Our old university play group did a 25 year celebration: the men hating amazon was married with 3 kids, the agile halfling thief was 341 pounds, the old massive dragon steak eating barbarian was thin as a pencil and vegan, ....

Sounds like life caught up with them. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not just CRPG. Also good old pen and paper. Our old university play group did a 25 year celebration: the men hating amazon was married with 3 kids, the agile halfling thief was 341 pounds, the old massive dragon steak eating barbarian was thin as a pencil and vegan, ....

 

Are we talking character to player transformation?

Or did they finally decide to change thins up after 25 year?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

It's not just CRPG. Also good old pen and paper. Our old university play group did a 25 year celebration: the men hating amazon was married with 3 kids, the agile halfling thief was 341 pounds, the old massive dragon steak eating barbarian was thin as a pencil and vegan, ....

Sounds like life caught up with them. ;)

Life catches up with us all, but that doesn't mean we have to go along willingly. It has to drag me kicking and screaming every inch of the way! Apparently although I am trapped in the wrecked body of a 56 year old, my wife reliably informs me that I am no longer a 12year old, I have now devolved to a 7 year old.

 

I justed started playing a lovely game called "Might and Magic 2: Gates to Another World". Thank Goodness for GOG.com

 

Old game? So what! Have I played it before? Probably, but who cares? You see I just learned one of the great gifts of getting older;

 

When you are senile and your memory is going, you can't remember all these wonderful old games and get to enjoy them again just like the first time!

:yay:WOOHOO! :yay:

Edited by podgie_bear
  • Like! 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel slightly old lately, as well, not that 30something has much of a rite to complain much. A buddy's kid brother came over the other day asking to borrow clothes, specifically relaxed wear that I'd like take the better half out to the movies in. That's.....kind of strange,but I can comply, minus the cowboy boots, no one wears my boots except me. After he got some clothes, I asked him why, and his response was "I'm going to a Halloween costume party as someone from the alternative rock phase of the 90s". So now, not only do I feel slightly old because my normal clothes can be worn as a period piece to a costume party, but I'm also out of fashion. Great. /s

  • Like! 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I played Diablo2 for the first time, I was almost panicking when Cain told me I had to hurry after the dark wanderer. I was so relieved when I realized that I didn't have to try since the game was just designed that way, but on the other hand I was a bit disappointed.

 

Also, as munk mentioned, graphics don't mean anything, at least for me. To explain that, I have a racing game on my PS3. Now, when I had a friend visiting and he tried said game, I did notice that there's motion blur on the edges of the screen. I had never noticed that before, because I was focused on other cars, chicanes and whatnot. I guess all the fancy glowing and reflecting stuff could just be replaced by plain red, green or blue circles and squares and it would work for me. Minecraft and Tetris good examples for what I mean - great games, and they have what? About a hundred 'pixels' or so. Of course fancy graphics are nice to have, but it's definitely not necessary. When I last went into a dungeon with my healer in WoW, almost all I saw were the health bars/numbers of my party members. And here I stand, I need to replace my graphics card and I'm again running out of hard drive space.

 

As I see it, companies just go straight after the money. However, they tend to go the wrong way. See DRM for example. Or 'debugging' - ten years ago, when any software had too many bugs, word got out and nobody bought it. Today, there are way more bugs AND way more people why buy it anyways. The company does some bugfixes and patches and updates, until months or even weeks later they decide to simply do the next version and everyone can just shut up and sit down. There is always someone curious (stupid?) enough to buy it and now there's suddenly pressure on everyone else to view files or play together and soon people go out and pay.

 

On my 1920x1080 screen, I can count the hairs in Aragorn's beard. How does that affect the movie? Exactly, it doesn't. But they go on and build 4k screens anyways. When I view a screenshot from my mobile on the big screen, the text is about as big as any other text I have on the big screen. However, on my mobile it's so tiny I have difficulty reading it. But since they get paid, they won't of course stop building stuff like that.

 

Oh, and they also go for money now. And by that I mean NOW! Every now and then I try to understand how they ignore the two bucks they could get tomorrow for the quarter they can get today. But, as my favorite Hynerian said: best not ponder questions like these, they'll only make your head hurt.

 

On the other hand, when there's some software that's working great and doing really good at a certain job, there's no need for advertising or pressure or whatever: almost everyone I know had winamp 2/3 back in the day. I still use 2.91 - last modified April 16th, 2003. Of course, that means no new money, at least from me. However, they did save the money for any commercials. One could suspect that advertising isn't needed at all. But then, you could just pay people to rate/review your product on amazon. Right after you pay people to enforce strange laws - even more suggestions at defectivebydesign.org.

 

/rant

  • Like! 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just found another gem, Lords of Xulima http://www.lordsofxulima.com/

Great old school rpg and developed by a small indie company. For what they have produced with this game, they deserve a whole lot of respect from the rpg community.

And if you want story and fantastic turn based combat how about Valkyria Chronicles http://store.steampowered.com/app/294860/

Yeah it's from Sega but it's one hell of a great rpg.

Unlike Munk I think the pc rpg market today is actually full of incredibly deep and involving games. I have fond memories of classics from the late 80's/early 90's but there is still a ton of games being released today that offer the role playing gamer satisfying gameplay.

It's just a shame that most get overlooked because professional reviewers these days seem to focus on the latest big name game release and have little time for the smaller, and in many cases superior, product from independent developers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×