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gogoblender

Eating healthy!

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Eating healthy. Low starches, zero sugar, pro biotics, lentils, mussels and clams (loads of iron) brown rice, fresh carrots, salmon (omega something...I forget what), tons of baby spinach, oh yeah and vitamins!
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Schot did all the math on this, I have to be careful of what I eat for this next few days as I'm under the weather. My platelets are very low for a human, and we're working hard on getting them up to speed.

No Mcd's?

 

Whatever shall we do

 

:oooo:

 

gogo

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Er.. I hate to break it to ya - but brown rice IS a starch. All rice is. It's just a little less processed than the white rice varieties. But everything is ok - IN MODERATION..!

 

I got a client recently who's big into eating healthy. His philosophy - if it goes into the fridge - it's food, if not, it's too processed and should NOT be eaten.

 

There are 3 exceptions I've found to his rule though and he was quite impressed that I could find any loopholes - Rice, beans (dried, not canned) and oatmeal...

 

Don't be feeling bad about McDonalds - they're food is garbage - even tho they've gone out of their way to make it look like it's getting better (mostly aimed at kids by adding apple slices and milk to their Crappy Meals) But they're still trash food. For that matter, Burger King and most of the other burger chains aren't much better.

 

Instead of focusing on what you can't have - focus on what you CAN. Are there any good Vietnamese restaurants in your area? If so, drop in and get yourself a big bowl of Pho (pronounced Fuh)... it's got some rice noodles in the bottom, followed by some thai basil leaf, green onions, some sliced rare steak (or chicken if you prefer), raw jalapeno rings, bean sprouts, cilantro (coriander leaf) and is topped off with boiling hot broth. You can add as much or as little of the veggies as you want - it's up to you. The broth cooks your veggies a bit when you put it into your bowl.

 

It's traditionally served with a bit of hoisin sauce and of course, sriracha sauce.

 

My former boss who fled Vietnam during the war and I used to go out for this stuff in the morning... GREAT stuff.

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As soon as you start to use maths a food can't be healthy. Too much thinking is stress, and stress is unhealthy. Add that people are not same. Lactose intolerance and other stuff is genetic. Thousand year old process to adapt people to local food. Just eat the favourite food your grandgrandgrandgrandma taught you can't be a mistake.

All studies showing that a certain group of people and their food has a longer life span are often ignoring the climate, working conditions and other factors.

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I beg to disagree, in part anyhow... Eating the way my parents/grandparents did back in the day would be quite lethal.

 

1.) They used copious amounts of lard - a coronary in the making

2.) I don't farm or do 12+ hours of heavy labor every day. I don't need the calories. The only farming I do these days is on my computer.

3.) My cholesterol (the bad one) was fairly high already and much of the cuisine they ate would be high in the stuff.

 

But I do agree that getting anal retentive about what you eat can be stressful - not to mention bloody annoying. I suppose that's why Gogo had Schot do the math for him. :D

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I was speaking ofmy grand^4-ma who died aged 103. She lived when the area had no train or road connection, so mainly from the local stuff. Pigs were wooly forest-pigs with way less fat, cows were used as a replacement for horses and only slaughtered when too old for work- tough low fat beef, sugar was not this white crystals but honey or melass from boiled sugar beets, plant oil was rare and a pot of pig fat had to last for a year,...

Most recipes were boiled not roasted food and she allways drunk a cup of Dickmilch in the morning. Dickmilch= bacteria fermented milk.

Add Sauerkraut, Rotkraut, Handkaese, Crayfishs were not endangered,....

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Also things depend on the individual. My body processes fat very well, but cannot handle carbohydrates at all well. My wife is completely opposite, so between us we do ok, I eat her fat stuff and she eats my carbs, lol.

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This topic was kind of a thank you thread to Brad. I'm getting some health issues in gear, feeling pretty awesome now, and this 10 day sit at the table of fibre, iron and non-Mcdonalds has gotten me back on track, and my blood work is responding awesome. Sugar's looking smart, and I feel strong. Brown Rice is pretty much the best stuff out there as a starch for a diabetic, this link's for you Wolfie from the American Diabetes Association, giving us some ideas on where to place things along a good healthy road map:

 

http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/ask-the-expert/ask-the-dietitian/archives/should-someone-with-diabetes.html

 

Stay away from white pasta, pretty much anything white and processed, and kiss Mcd's gbye!

well...most of the time anyway :P

 

Chattius, love your words on moderation...yeah, trying to live on a 24/7 mcd's diet don't cut it huh^^

 

Podgie, carbs don't work for you, do they affect you badly quickly?

 

:)

 

gogo

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One thing from my grand^4ma I forgot: local mills were outdated then. While the modern mills in towns had fine sieves to turn the flour into fine white powder, local mills lacked them. Whole grain flour a century before its benefits for health become known.

No train or roads- the relative small area was forced to produce all what was needed for itself. To prevent misharvests there was no monoculture but a brought mix - again something good for the health without people knowing it at the time.

Not much cows or calfs to be slaughtered so normal cheese couldn't be done. Bacteria fermented cheese (Handkäse) is today considered as one of the traditional lowest fat cheeses in the world.

---

If your diabetes doesn't come hand in hand with an allergy against Gluten:

Ever tried Grünkern? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gr%C3%BCnkern

Grünkern was discovered when unripe spelt had to be harvested because of bad weather.

Grünkern stew recipe in english: http://kitchen-tested.com/2011/06/23/gruenkern-stew/

The wife of my brother in law suffers from diabetes: One recipe we do when she visits is paprica filled with mushrooms and Grünkern

262034-big-gefuellte-paprikaschoten-mit-

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That was a very supportive post, I feel even better now

Thanks Chattius

 

:hugs:

 

gogo

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One thing from my grand^4ma I forgot: local mills were outdated then. While the modern mills in towns had fine sieves to turn the flour into fine white powder, local mills lacked them. Whole grain flour a century before its benefits for health become known.

No train or roads- the relative small area was forced to produce all what was needed for itself. To prevent misharvests there was no monoculture but a brought mix - again something good for the health without people knowing it at the time.

Not much cows or calfs to be slaughtered so normal cheese couldn't be done. Bacteria fermented cheese (Handkäse) is today considered as one of the traditional lowest fat cheeses in the world.

---

If your diabetes doesn't come hand in hand with an allergy against Gluten:

Ever tried Grünkern? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gr%C3%BCnkern

Grünkern was discovered when unripe spelt had to be harvested because of bad weather.

Grünkern stew recipe in english: http://kitchen-tested.com/2011/06/23/gruenkern-stew/

The wife of my brother in law suffers from diabetes: One recipe we do when she visits is paprica filled with mushrooms and Grünkern

262034-big-gefuellte-paprikaschoten-mit-

 

I'm confused... You say there weren't many cows and calves slaughtered - so cheese couldn't be made? Er.. What part of the dead cow/calf is used for cheese? Last I checked, most cheese was made from milk - either cow, sheep. goat or some combination of the lot.

 

Unless you mean head cheese which really isn't cheese in the conventional sense... Head cheese being bits of meat that are held together in gelatin made by boiling bones and such to extract it.

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Podgie, carbs don't work for you, do they affect you badly quickly?

gogo

 

When I moved house I had to change to a new local doctor who decided that I should not be eating what I have eaten all my life and move to a low fat, high carb diet. I had irritable bowel syndrome for months, gained 45 pounds in weight and my cholesterol doubled!

After some research, I told the doctor to get lost, went back to a low carb diet, cured my irritable bowel syndrome, lowered my cholestrerol and have lost 30 pounds so far. But it its hard loosing that last 15 pounds or so, since its difficult to exercise when you need 2 sticks to even walk. The modern 'fad' for low fat and high carbs doesn't take account of the fact that not all people respond the same way to different foods. Dieticians have gotten lazy, refer to a standard chart and expect it to fit everyone, rather than take each person on an individual basis and tailor diets to the patient's needs and circumstances. I have a friend who had to be admitted to hospital because her dietician took no account of the fact that she needed a glutten free diet and just gave her a standard low fat diet sheet to follow.

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Most cheese needs rennet from calf stomachs. In switzerland most calves were slaughtered for cheese making. Nowadays there is artificial rennet. The rennet thickens milk for digesting and is mainly found only in stomachs of young mammals.

Our local cheese is made from quark using bacteria and not rennet.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rennet

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sour_milk_cheese

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handkäse

 

 

We do our own cheese, buying some fresh milk from a nearby farmer. We have this nice swiss army knife staircase in our house. Drying fruits, riping cheese, making gruenkern, walking up and down, slide on it, heating the house, ... Nice staircase.

 

http://darkmatters.org/forums/index.php?/topic/18412-what-is-the-latest-big-real-life-project-you-started/

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Yah.. well.. I think most dieticians work off those sheets based on what they call standard models - mainly because they work for "most" people. As with any rule, there are bound to be exceptions.

 

Then again, the whole diet thing changes with the wind - one week it's high fat, low carb, the next it's low fat, high carb. The thing that most fail to consider is how many calories you burn in an average day. People who live an active lifestyle - where you're running around all day will need more carbs than those who sit on their backside and burn through less.

 

I do have one question tho... Why did you wait so long? I dunno... If I had irritable bowel syndrome, I think I would have been back at the Dr's office post haste, bitching about it ASAP. I wouldn't have waited to put on 45 lbs either. If I noticed myself getting heavier, I'd also be back at the Dr's office - and if the Dr tells me to just suffer through it - I would have 86'ed him right then and there and found someone less thickheaded.

 

Truth be told, I find most doctors to be an insufferable lot. They rarely listen. I've had a few that were quite pigheaded. Tho in fairness, while my 2nd to last doctor was like that, he did do me right most of the time. He didn't take the time to explain some things that perhaps should have been explained a bit better. He expected me to do a bunch of research on my own. It's like yah.. right. Like I've got time to study medicine. It's not like I'm gonna ever be a doctor or a dietician...

 

Btw.. One good way to lose weight - is cut out salt. Too much sodium will make you retain water like it's nobody's business. If you eat lots of food that's salty, well, you get the general idea. The last time I was in the hospital for an infection, I lost like 38 pounds in 4 days - mainly because they do NOT use salt in the foods they prepare. It wasn't pleasant going cold turkey on salt, but it was nice to be able to ratchet in the belt an extra notch or two. Unfortunately, after getting out of the hospital, I went back to my old habits and gained most of that water weight back because I went back to using salt.

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Most cheese needs rennet from calf stomachs. In switzerland most calves were slaughtered for cheese making. Nowadays there is artificial rennet. The rennet thickens milk for digesting and is mainly found only in stomachs of young mammals.

Our local cheese is made from quark using bacteria and not rennet.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rennet

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sour_milk_cheese

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handkäse

 

 

We do our own cheese, buying some fresh milk from a nearby farmer. We have this nice swiss army knife staircase in our house. Drying fruits, riping cheese, making gruenkern, walking up and down, slide on it, heating the house, ... Nice staircase.

 

http://darkmatters.org/forums/index.php?/topic/18412-what-is-the-latest-big-real-life-project-you-started/

 

Oh.. Right.. I forgot bout the rennet..

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Yah.. well.. I think most dieticians work off those sheets based on what they call standard models - mainly because they work for "most" people. As with any rule, there are bound to be exceptions.

 

Then again, the whole diet thing changes with the wind - one week it's high fat, low carb, the next it's low fat, high carb. The thing that most fail to consider is how many calories you burn in an average day. People who live an active lifestyle - where you're running around all day will need more carbs than those who sit on their backside and burn through less.

 

I do have one question tho... Why did you wait so long? I dunno... If I had irritable bowel syndrome, I think I would have been back at the Dr's office post haste, bitching about it ASAP. I wouldn't have waited to put on 45 lbs either. If I noticed myself getting heavier, I'd also be back at the Dr's office - and if the Dr tells me to just suffer through it - I would have 86'ed him right then and there and found someone less thickheaded.

 

Truth be told, I find most doctors to be an insufferable lot. They rarely listen. I've had a few that were quite pigheaded. Tho in fairness, while my 2nd to last doctor was like that, he did do me right most of the time. He didn't take the time to explain some things that perhaps should have been explained a bit better. He expected me to do a bunch of research on my own. It's like yah.. right. Like I've got time to study medicine. It's not like I'm gonna ever be a doctor or a dietician...

 

Btw.. One good way to lose weight - is cut out salt. Too much sodium will make you retain water like it's nobody's business. If you eat lots of food that's salty, well, you get the general idea. The last time I was in the hospital for an infection, I lost like 38 pounds in 4 days - mainly because they do NOT use salt in the foods they prepare. It wasn't pleasant going cold turkey on salt, but it was nice to be able to ratchet in the belt an extra notch or two. Unfortunately, after getting out of the hospital, I went back to my old habits and gained most of that water weight back because I went back to using salt.

I did keep going back until I lost patience with the Doctor's obsession with what could be causing it not being related to the new diet. When I pointed out that it all started there and I never had problems before he denied this was the cause. In the end I changed back, did things my way, went back showed him the results, called him an ignorant braindead idiot that I didn't trust anymore. It didn't do much for our relationship, he doesn't want to see me anymore and I can live with that.

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Thats why my wife has a coffee grinder and a boiler in her doctor room. Some relaxed talking while she prepares the coffee and often getting some information before the realexamination starts. But with the way health insurance pays examinations, it would be just 8 minutes for a standard. So the examination time has to be creativly redistributed away from healthy persons to ones with no diagnosis yet.

But she is a countryside doc, so nearly all people are known for lot of years now. And often it is such simple as a pet died and the person is sitting at home instead walking with the dog. But at a village she knows this, shw probably wouldn't know in abig town.

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I wish it was still like that here. It used to be, but no longer despite the fact we are a small rural town and not a big crowded city. Local surgeries around here are now queue in a communal waiting area for hours, get rushed in to the doctor, get 3 minutes if you are lucky and get rushed out again. Usually after being 'fobbed off' with take painkillers and come back if it gets worse. Our health service is going downhill faster than a snowball in an avalanche zone!

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My Great Aunt lived to be 98. She was careful with her health after her teen years... she had a kidney removed before high school...

After that, she was very careful.

She carried a bit of extra weight around... always loved her food.

 

She attributed her longevity to morning oatmeal. She sprinkled a tablespoon of "Canadian" ground flax seed on her oatmeal everyday.

 

So, there you have it: Her secret: flax seed. (very good source of healthy oil).

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The only thing I completely avoid in my diet, is Mcdonalds... I try to avoid other deep fried and fast food places, like KFC and Steers, and for the best part of this year I have avoided it. In fact I have only had KFC 4 times in 2 years, and then I order their wraps because I actually like them... :badbad: . Other things that I try to avoid are deep fried foods, like chips/french fries, was probably one of the hardest dietary changes I made, because in my line of work there will always be left over chips that the staff eats, with lots of salt... getting... craving.... want.... salty....chips....AAAAAAAWWWW! :viking: !

 

but that is over for me.

If I don't eat/nibble/chew/taste at work, then I try to cook something from scratch at home. and then it involves lots of vegetables. sometimes pasta, very seldom rice(I do love risotto however), and protein... depends on my mood and if I took meat out to defrost. I can't remember the last time I bought a bread, I used to take a leftover from work at Delaire, but that is over now(the flour was very course and not refined - very "organic"). I do eat lots of couverture chocolate come to think of it... and butter, a slice of freshly baked bread with some butter. I won't EVER be able to completely leave that out.

 

and I started going to the gym. at first I thought it would be terrible, but I actually do enjoy it now. I try to go 3 times a week and then I run for 20min on the treadmill(that is the best part for me) I try to do atleast 4km, and the last couple of times I managed 4,45km. after that, depends on my mood.

When I get home, Something with protein is required to help repair muscles. but it doesn't have to be much.

 

Delta!

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I use to carry some of these cherry size radish with me. Whenever I feel hungry I eat one. Worked fine when I was in exams mainlyreading books and not moving around. I got so used to it that I still do it.

So no other snacks between the main meals

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Diet is a four letter word. A better choice when trying to eat better is "improve nutrition". That phrase has no negative connotations.

The same is true with the word exercise. A better choice is "increase activity". And then look at over all activity over the course of a day. Where can you add a few steps, or climbing a set of stairs. Don't look at going to the gym as your whole exercise plan. Just getting to a gym can be impossible for some people.

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Gym?

Never was in any if you exclude 8 years army. Breast muscle training is feeding the horses, using a 7 feet fork to move 60 pounds hay packets, or cleaning the horses. Onetime the left hand is front of thefork, the next time right...

Rubber band running... Have Dogs

Bicycle , use one for transports below ground at work,...

Stepper, same muscles as driving my bike crosscountry to work...

 

Okay it helps to have a doc as wife who made a list which muscles I have and which normal activities would train them if doing certain moves.

 

Next gym is 20 minutes away with the bike, 30 with car. Changing clothes, shower,... All in all 3 hours for 45 minutes at the gym?

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Great points! I love finding new ways to optimize nutrition. I had an urge for a coffee just an hour ago but I decided to try a more nutritous version of my usual coffee, milk and sugar. Instead I chopped up some strawberry, banana, orange, grapes and pineapple. Added them to my bullet blender. Dropped a spoonful of instant coffee, filled it up with water and mixed it up. Surprisingly, it was really good. Next time I'll cut out the high acid fruits and mix with milk. That should be a great tastey caffeine treat with some nutrition. :)

I feel the same about gyms these days. Complete waist of money. I've used gyms for many years and the fact is... If I had everything I needed at home to exercise I would be much more active. I've got some simple stuff already. Only thing I really need is an effective home cardio option. Not that I "need" to exercise per se. But I really do often get the urge to make my heart work. At the moment I have a mini trampoline and I love it. Though it's a cheap one so it shifts around a lot and gets noisy sometimes. I'll probably buy a higher quality one sometime this winter. It's much kinder than jogging on the knees. :)

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I do try to go to my pool therapy class on Saturdays. That's the closest I get to going to a gym. It's offered at the last clinic that I had rehap therapy with. That was a couple of years ago. And this is the longest I've lasted with any kind of post therapy program. It's because there is that support of this class.

Doing the post program exercises on my own -- I think my record is about 3 months.

As far as eating goes, it's a one meal at a time thing for me. And making wiser choices can be really difficult.

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Wow, there's some serious love/hate relationships going on with McDonald's.

 

When I first got out of law school, I had a clerkship, and was making just barely enough to pay all the bills and eat. I was too proud to call home and ask for any extra money, although I would have been given it and could have eaten like a king.

 

So, instead, I tried to budget my income, and sadly, a lot of the cheapest foods are the worst: packaged things, frozen processed things, dollar menu fast food items. So for several months McDonald's and Wendy's was big part of my diet, not because I liked it, but because I could get a hamburger or chicken nuggets for a dollar, and because they were open 24 hours, so no matter how late I worked I could quickly get a cheap, hot meal.

 

I grew to $^ing hate McDonald's. It's been almost a year now since I've gotten a better job and have enough money to buy whatever groceries I like, and I have not gone back to McDonald's once. I may never again. Not because I'm bravely resisting some craving or temptation, but because I HATED having to eat that crappy garbage food for so long.

 

 

Anyway...maybe I missed it but no mention of cruciferous vegetables yet? They are the king of vegetables IMO. I was reading this article about broccoli and by the third page I wanted some so bad I had to stop and go get some. Literally crunching on some as I type.

Broccoli's Extreme Makeover

 

Really interesting, and highlights a lot of the problems with getting people to eat more vegetables. It's treated as an unpleasant duty, rather something natural and enjoyable.

 

Maybe one of the main problems is that people are always trying to cook it? I like the cool crunch of raw vegetables!

 

broccoli.jpg

 

 

One other dietary habit is that I don't eat 3 big meals. I graze. Every couple hours, I eat something. I guess you could say it's like eating 6-7 very small meals a day.

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