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Food glorious food - What are you eating


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3 hours ago, chattius said:

It is not only global warming, nuclear disasters which gave birth to the idea. I know that Germany has a big seed bank for wheat, corn, barley, ... Old sorts which are dying out because of the more productive gen manipulated ones. They are kept in case that a new disease may affect the new sorts. Same reason I have old sort of hens and a cow dog. Noone wants them anymore, too few eggs per year. But give me a hen which can survive -20C, catches mice and young rats, ...

That hen must be wearing some snazzy fur coat

:lol:

gogo

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23 minutes ago, lujate said:

I fry the plantains.  I slice them about 1/4-3/8" and fry in a cast iron skillet.  Five minutes per side and serve.  I end up with something that vaguely resembles home fries.

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I'm sold on that salt-encrusted crispy brown-edge "feel" ... plantains... really?

:bounce:

gogo

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9 minutes ago, gogoblender said:

I'm sold on that salt-encrusted crispy brown-edge "feel" ... plantains... really?

:bounce:

gogo

You can see the golden brown plantains around the edges of my bowl. :drool:

Plantains (green & ripe) appear frequently in my kitchen.  I can't recall the last time I did anything with a white potato.

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2 minutes ago, lujate said:

You can see the golden brown plantains around the edges of my bowl. :drool:

Plantains (green & ripe) appear frequently in my kitchen.  I can't recall the last time I did anything with a white potato.

lol...the quality of that pic was so good...I thought it was something you had grabbed from the net not your own plate...thats some insane lighting you have going 

:lol:

gogo

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We've been invited to a BBQ tonight. Not our usual preferred social interaction, but we're trying to foster a friendship with our upstairs neighbors We take care of their cat when they're gone, and they've offered to take care of Piper as well. 

Anyhoo. We'll be making our own pork sausage today and barbecuing that along with whatever else we bring along. 

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5 hours ago, Delta! said:

We've been invited to a BBQ tonight. Not our usual preferred social interaction, but we're trying to foster a friendship with our upstairs neighbors We take care of their cat when they're gone, and they've offered to take care of Piper as well. 

Anyhoo. We'll be making our own pork sausage today and barbecuing that along with whatever else we bring along. 

I love how food helps with everything ! What better way to say hello than with something yummy... specially when it comes to cat sitting .  I've always been piqued by sausage making.. do you guys have casings and machine to make these at home? Is there a spice profile you're interested in making for them with particular herbs?

:)

 

gogo

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Spices...

If you buy the meat at a butcher you get more or less the same fat/muscle-meat ratio. When butchering yourself and use all than you have to adapt the spice amount to the ratio - mainly by tasting the raw grinded mix. It has to taste a bit soft because smoking, boiling will make it taste stronger.

In Germany the used spices differ a lot by the area. So if the guest are not living near I try to avoid spicing with herbs /caramay, rosmarin,...) and use the more traditional: salt, white pepper, nutmeg. Boar and farm pig is a huge difference also.

A big different in sausages between countryside and town is that at town there were big coolhouses. At countryside the butchering was only done at cold weather to avoid flies and maggots. So the sausages at countryside had to last till the next winter (Ahle Woscht - old sausage). In towns people bought the sausage for the next days, no need to make them last long (Lyoner , english bologna sausage?, ice is mixed in to make them soft).

Bratwurst in our area was mainly done around x-mas markets. Summer BBQ bratwurst needed half a year cooling or summer butchering, so normally not done before the time of refridgerators around1960+.

Of cause there are my Käsewildschweinbratwürste. Boars(wildschwein) are butchered all around the year, mainly because of road kills/injuries. They have a strong taste and the kids disliked them. So I did a mild cheese into the mix to weaken the taste.

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23 hours ago, gogoblender said:

lol...the quality of that pic was so good...I thought it was something you had grabbed from the net not your own plate...thats some insane lighting you have going 

:lol:

gogo

The poutine pic is mine via my digital SLR.  The home fries pic is from the web.

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Spoiled this yea for Christmas... my Aunt and Uncle always have lots of heart for the bachelors in the family...  boy did they ever do us good...  beet root curry, crab salad, , soufle (broken but still lovely as shards in a bag :lol: ) a dish of roast root veggies and asparagus, thai chicken, spicy pork, home made cheese cake, my uncles' own ginger brad cookies in a beautiful jar that he gifted out to the family, and two cups of my Aunt's lovely fruit pudding with fruity things on top... deeeeeeeeeeeeelish

 

 

 

 

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Most of my Christmas presents this year were food.  Got a tin of some kind of homemade Oreo balls from my boss's wife, and two Christmas tree cakes from my mom (vanilla and chocolate).

Favorite might be this cheesecake that a friend & co-worker made me though:

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5 hours ago, Flix said:

Most of my Christmas presents this year were food.  Got a tin of some kind of homemade Oreo balls from my boss's wife, and two Christmas tree cakes from my mom (vanilla and chocolate).

Favorite might be this cheesecake that a friend & co-worker made me though:

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I always remember your chocolate cakes from your mom that you've posted o'er years.  That of all the foods, its that chocolate cake thats your favorite. that cheese cake is looking rich...that was one of my favorite gifts this year from my Aunt and Uncle... u know Ben, I'm coming to love more and more the great food experiences my family shares with me vs all the "items" that gather dust after a few weeks :lol: 
I do believe I shall perform an undertaking...and take on upon me a new baking skill for next year

:thumbsup:

gogo

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Aunt and Uncle dropped this off for us dec 31st ... its tradition for sinhalese to eat prepared Kiribath first of month and especially auspicious first of the year..its a kind of coconut rice with seeni sambul (spicy onion stuff) and some potatoes...  i dont have the skillz for this, xoxo to the family helping out a non-cook like us :lol:

 

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:theuns:

gogo

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My Cousin's, wife's, Mom keeps sending us Hickory Farms every year... its kind of becoming a hidden "groan" cuz.. yah when I was a kid i used to love going to Hockory Farms stores when i was a kid... packed and filled with smoky flavors...but now upon being in our grown up years we realize the stuff is SO OVER PROCESSED AND YUCKY

:4rofl:

awwww...she means well.. happy Christmas Nanna... here's the plate we just took out yesterday.. *gulp* :sick:

 

 

 

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With the colder weather setting in, a pot of spag done at the beginning of the week always hits the spot in a time-pinch... lean beef, rosemary, tomatoes, garlic, salt, super-tin sliced tomaotes, more garlic and some kind of more expensive mushroom :viking: dunno the name but resent having to buy them

 

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Oh yah and chilli peppers... lots and lots of chilli peppers...

 

:D

 

gogo

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Found several places with young 'Gemeine Samtfüssrüblinge - common satin feet beet-ling' yesterday. They are related to the Enoki mushrooms, just wild and not cultivated. Gave them to the kids for food experiments.

I would take a bundle, wrap bacon around it and put in on the grill, or a soup, or...

Wonder what they will do.

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My Sweet cousin came and dropped off some chicken curry he made in his slow cooker for me...just scant minutes before I had to work...epic!

Didnt know a slow cooker could do this macickery... gonna see if i can pick one up... it seems like it can process a bunch of food at once

:)

gogo

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and... two days in a row now... i like this :dance:

he loves using that slow cooker... while I (when actually cooking beans or legumes) just dump them pre-cooked from a can, he actually soaks and boils and then gets these goodies from the slow cookah...

beans, seasoned rice (kind of pickly? :drool: ) and that chicken...  I only got a few bites left for today... looking forward to eating

 

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I actually picked up some steaks  two  x 3 ... and tried to cook them in my stainless steel fry pan.. hello sticking... i had forgotten how cooking meat is an art and had to constantly keep moving stuff around... but i wasnt too unhappy with the results... that sear on the meat was just fantastic!

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Salmon was pm sale yesterday and decided to pick up a piece... it takes some kahunas to cook meat ...  wish it was easier but maybe ill slowly get there..i had a friend on the phone last night coaching me through some sms... I think maybe ill do a voice coaching next time.. Salmon with a honey /sri racha glaze...i have another chunk left Ill try again tonight :D

 

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She said make sure the pan is extra hot... but im not sure stainless steel gets hot enough?

:oooo:

gogo

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Stainless steel does get hot enough... but I find that a gas stove does it the best, and a cast iron pan to go with it, or Le Creuset...

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15 minutes ago, Delta! said:

Le Creuset...

how do you do it with that?

I have some really old ones from 30 years ago...kind of super chipped .. but we can fry on that surface?

:)

 

gogo

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Yes. It takes a while to warm up to the proper temperature, but it will work. Make sure it is at the desired, but not too hot temp, add the oil/butter/ghee/fat, quickly let it warm up, then add the salmon skin side down first

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While the fatherside from my wife were car and bike racers and mechanics, the motherside were potters. They made clay pots for cooking. The advantage of clay cooking is that all the taste giving liquid stays in the pot. The pot is watered before use so no burned meat. Was nice for people who did farm work. Put the pot in the oven, do 3-4 hours work outside the house return and meal is ready.

We have 6 clay pots in different sizes and for different uses. My wife made one of them and it is used a lot for bread baking. Sadly not much uses for the others this year. The 3-5 hours being in the oven makes it more a birthday party thing than daily use. And because of covid19....

Preparing a Zander (west european fish). Taste of hay and charcoal added with the preparation. And the typical german Sauerkraut taste ;)

 

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19 hours ago, chattius said:

While the fatherside from my wife were car and bike racers and mechanics, the motherside were potters. They made clay pots for cooking. The advantage of clay cooking is that all the taste giving liquid stays in the pot. The pot is watered before use so no burned meat. Was nice for people who did farm work. Put the pot in the oven, do 3-4 hours work outside the house return and meal is ready.

We have 6 clay pots in different sizes and for different uses. My wife made one of them and it is used a lot for bread baking. Sadly not much uses for the others this year. The 3-5 hours being in the oven makes it more a birthday party thing than daily use. And because of covid19....

Preparing a Zander (west european fish). Taste of hay and charcoal added with the preparation. And the typical german Sauerkraut taste ;)

 

 We actually use clay pots in some traditional cooking sri lankan cooking as well.  I first realized its distinction during my last visit to Oman to visit my Aunt and Uncle... Auntie is a beautiful cook and is vegetarian, she would always have loads of delicious curries in array every morning when we came down for breakfast. 

 

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:)

 

gogo

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A Römertopf has a cap/cover. Because of the water in the clay walls the food isn't burned and needs no additional liquid (water/wine/oil). So all the taste stays in the food and no taste goes in the boiling liquid or into the air as in normal pots.

Without a cap the no burning effect is still there, but water leaves. Good way to thicken food.

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